Jay Arnold and Tom Neir of the Kirkland City Council present Dave Ramsay with the first-of-its-kind Founders Award at the city’s Volunteer Appreciation Celebration on April 12. Katie Metzger/staff photo

Jay Arnold and Tom Neir of the Kirkland City Council present Dave Ramsay with the first-of-its-kind Founders Award at the city’s Volunteer Appreciation Celebration on April 12. Katie Metzger/staff photo

Kirkland honors volunteers, including first Founders Award winner

Volunteers gave 33,000 hours to the city in 2017, a contribution valued at $1 million.

In 2017, Kirkland engaged 5,989 volunteers who gave more than 33,000 hours of their time and talents to the city. Their contributions last year are valued at $1 million.

On April 12, the city hosted its annual Volunteer Appreciation Celebration at the Peter Kirk Community Center. Council members Jay Arnold and Tom Neir gave out a variety of awards to volunteers of all ages, including the first Founders Award to Dave Ramsay, the former city manager who started the Green Kirkland Partnership.

The event theme this year was inspired by springtime, as volunteers — including individuals, families, schools, youth groups, neighborhoods, corporate groups and service clubs — help the community to grow and thrive.

Kirkland honors its volunteers at an April 12 dinner and ceremony at the Peter Kirk Community Center. Katie Metzger/staff photo

Kirkland honors its volunteers at an April 12 dinner and ceremony at the Peter Kirk Community Center. Katie Metzger/staff photo

City manager Kurt Triplett said the origin of the word “volunteer” comes from the Latin “voluntarius,” which means “willing.”

“Thank you for being willing to keep our parks looking amazing by pulling weeds and planting trees. Thank you for being willing to help us out with police and fire…for being willing to be our emergency radio operators…and for being willing to take care of our street flags and all of the other amazing things you do,” he said to the volunteers before Arnold and Neir started announcing the award winners.

The Leadership award was given to Peter Kirk Community Center volunteer Jeanette Carter and Green Kirkland Partnership volunteer Jim Hunt.

Pedestrian flag steward and parks volunteer Kobey Chew, Green Kirkland Partnership volunteer Norm McKinley, community center volunteer Gail Schaeffer and UW-REN students Audrey, Sam, Elise, Bryan, Alec, Jason and Beth received the Above and Beyond the Call of Duty award.

Recipients of the ABCD award — the 2017-18 UW-REN students, Norm McKinley and Kobey Chew — pose with Kirkland Deputy Mayor Jay Arnold (left), City Council member Tom Neir and Volunteer Services Coordinator Patrick Tefft. Katie Metzger/staff photo

Recipients of the ABCD award — the 2017-18 UW-REN students, Norm McKinley and Kobey Chew — pose with Kirkland Deputy Mayor Jay Arnold (left), City Council member Tom Neir and Volunteer Services Coordinator Patrick Tefft. Katie Metzger/staff photo

The Behind the Scenes award was given to Kirkland police youth explorers volunteer Nicole Benson, human resources volunteer Kris Carlson, community center volunteers Rosie and Tina Conforti, Kirkland emergency communications team volunteer Jim Hughes, digital communications/media volunteer Jose Lopez, Green Kirkland Partnership volunteer Doug Murray, human resources/city hall front desk volunteer Sheryl Owens and Sue Contreras, who volunteers for the Cross Kirkland Corridor, parks and Green Kirkland.

Mary De Friel, of the Kirkland emergency communications team, received the Kirkland Fire Milton “Bob” Knight ARES award.

Eileen Trentman Youth Scholarship awards were given to Lauren Peterson and Tamini Smart of the Kirkland Youth Council and Christian Tomisser of the Kirkland Police Youth Explorers.

Eileen Trentman Youth Scholarship award winners Lauren Peterson and Christian Tomisser pose with Kirkland Deputy Mayor Jay Arnold (left), City Council member Tom Neir and Volunteer Services Coordinator Patrick Tefft. Katie Metzger/staff photo

Eileen Trentman Youth Scholarship award winners Lauren Peterson and Christian Tomisser pose with Kirkland Deputy Mayor Jay Arnold (left), City Council member Tom Neir and Volunteer Services Coordinator Patrick Tefft. Katie Metzger/staff photo

The city also recognized all volunteers who contributed more than 10 hours last year in the event program.

See kirklandwa.gov for more.

Kirkland City Council member Tom Neir hands out awards to the students on the University of Washington Restoration Ecology Network Team who restored one-third of an acre in North Rose Hill Woodlands Park. Katie Metzger/staff photo

Kirkland City Council member Tom Neir hands out awards to the students on the University of Washington Restoration Ecology Network Team who restored one-third of an acre in North Rose Hill Woodlands Park. Katie Metzger/staff photo

Volunteers mingle over a light dinner at last week’s Volunteer Appreciation Celebration. Katie Metzger/staff photo

Volunteers mingle over a light dinner at last week’s Volunteer Appreciation Celebration. Katie Metzger/staff photo

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