Congresswoman Suzan DelBene poses with Kirkland city councilmembers and city employees where the Cross Kirkland Corridor runs through Totem Lake. Kirkland is seeking $10 million to help it complete a bridge project that would connect the corridor and provide a safe crossing over a busy intersection. Katie Metzger/staff photo

Congresswoman Suzan DelBene poses with Kirkland city councilmembers and city employees where the Cross Kirkland Corridor runs through Totem Lake. Kirkland is seeking $10 million to help it complete a bridge project that would connect the corridor and provide a safe crossing over a busy intersection. Katie Metzger/staff photo

DelBene visits highways, trails on infrastructure tour

Congresswoman highlights Kirkland’s Totem Lake bridge and other projects in need of federal funding.

Rep. Suzan DelBene (WA-01) announced the start of an infrastructure tour of the First Congressional District to get a firsthand look at local projects that could help drive economic growth and support good-paying jobs in the region.

She plans to visit project sites across the district over the next year. The first three stops of DelBene’s tour occurred on March 20 in Snohomish and King counties.

“There are many roads, rails, bridges and tunnels across Washington state that are in need of improvements. Making these critical investments will not only improve our infrastructure, it will bolster our economy by adding good-paying jobs for middle class families. I look forward to hearing from people on the ground and taking their message back to Washington, D.C., where I will keep fighting for more infrastructure dollars for our region,” stated DelBene, a member of the House Ways and Means Committee.

DelBene toured the Totem Lake Connector Bridge project site in Kirkland, which upon completion, will be a bicycle and pedestrian bridge. It will connect two ends of the Cross Kirkland Corridor that are currently divided by a complicated intersection, which carries upwards of 50,000 vehicles every day.

Totem Lake is experiencing tremendous re-development, and the concept of the bridge is to “connect and unify the community through an iconic gateway,” said Kirkland Mayor Penny Sweet.

The bridge will connect Totem Lake to Woodinville and Redmond, as well as complete a key link in the regional trail system. Design is complete and construction is expected to take about two years. Kirkland has allocated more than a third of the funds necessary to build the $18.4 million bridge and is asking the federal government for the remaining $10 million.

Earlier in the day, DelBene visited the I-405/SR-522/527 improvement project in Bothell that would widen I-405 through the SR-522 interchange and build direct access ramps to the express toll lanes to help ease congestion and the Hwy 2 trestle in Everett that is in need of maintenance to ease the heavy traffic and the high volume of accidents.

“These projects are important to our region and the economy in our region and making sure that we have traffic flow and transit opportunities is key,” DelBene, who is vice chair of the New Democrat Coalition, told the Reporter.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@kirklandreporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.kirklandreporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

Congresswoman Suzan DelBene and Kirkland Mayor Penny Sweet listen to Kirkland employees explain the importance of the Totem Lake Connector project to the city and the region. Katie Metzger/staff photo

Congresswoman Suzan DelBene and Kirkland Mayor Penny Sweet listen to Kirkland employees explain the importance of the Totem Lake Connector project to the city and the region. Katie Metzger/staff photo

John Starbard from Kirkland’s public works department shows Congresswoman Suzan DelBene how the Totem Lake Connector will improve the experience for cars, pedestrians and bicyclists at the busiest intersection in the city. Katie Metzger/staff photo

John Starbard from Kirkland’s public works department shows Congresswoman Suzan DelBene how the Totem Lake Connector will improve the experience for cars, pedestrians and bicyclists at the busiest intersection in the city. Katie Metzger/staff photo

More in News

King County assessor wants Legislature to fix laws to help small businesses

Changes needed because of COVID-19 impact on commercial properties

King County could be in Phase 2 in two weeks

The county is also hoping the state lets them reopen several businesses by Friday.

Exterior Kirkland City Hall. Blake Peterson/staff photo
City: Businesses in downtown, other commercial areas encouraged to remain closed through June 2

Update: Phase 1 businesses are now encouraged to reopen but remain vigilant.

Downtown Kirkland. Staff photo/Blake Peterson
Update: Kirkland officials strongly encouraging residents to stay out of downtown area, waterfront parks after 1 p.m.

The recommendations are in response to a potential protest in Downtown Kirkland at 2 p.m.

Businesses asked to close by 1 p.m., visitors to avoid commercial shopping areas

The City of Kirkland states it has received reports of being a possible target for looting

Downtown Kirkland. Blake Peterson/staff photo
How is COVID-19 impacting Kirkland?

King County has released city-specific data on case rates, unemployment filings and more.

Kabal Gill, owner of East India Grill in Federal Way, wears gloves to hand over take-out orders at his restaurant on March 23. File photo
New guidelines for Phase 2 reopenings in King County

All workers will need to wear masks as restaurants, retail shops and other businesses reopen.

This undated file photo provided by U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows CDC’s laboratory test kit for the new coronavirus. Courtesy photo
Inslee wants nursing home residents and staff tested by June 12

Governor says state will pay for test kits and personal protective equipment.

Most Read