Kirkland City Council to interview five finalists for vacancy

Neal Black, Uzma Butte, Kelli Curtis, Amy Falcone and Sue Keller were selected.

  • Tuesday, February 12, 2019 10:52am
  • News

The Kirkland City Council has selected five candidates to interview at a special meeting on Feb. 19 to fill the current council vacancy: Neal Black, Uzma Butte, Kelli Curtis, Amy Falcone and Sue Keller.

An Interview Selection Committee, consisting of Councilmember Dave Asher, Councilmember Toby Nixon and Mayor Penny Sweet, reviewed submissions from 27 candidates and recommended five finalists to be interviewed by the entire council. The full council concurred with their recommendation. Interviews will occur at 2:45 p.m. in the City Hall Council Chamber.

Black has been a resident of Kirkland for more than 20 years. He currently resides in the Central Houghton Neighborhood with his wife and two teenagers. Black currently serves as a member of the Houghton Community Council, to which he was elected in 2017.

Butte has been a Kirkland resident for eight years. Butte currently serves on the Kirkland Park Board and is an active member of the Kirkland Rotary, the Kirkland Chamber, KirklandSafe, and the Eastside Race and Leadership Coalition.

Curtis has been a Kirkland resident for more than 25 years. Curtis serves on the Houghton Community Council and the City of Kirkland Park Board. Additionally, Curtis volunteers with Kirkland Talks.

Falcone has been a resident of Kirkland for the past five years. Falcone currently serves on the Human Services Commission, is a Finn Hill Neighborhood Alliance Board Member, and a local PTSA President.

Keller has lived in Kirkland for more than 21 years. In the past, Keller served on the Park Board. She has also been involved with Kirkland Conversations, Eastside Timebank, Nourishing Networks, and on the PTSA Board at Peter Kirk and Kirkland Juanita High School.

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