Stacey Porter sits with her two children, Isaac, 9, and Lucy, 7, in their new home. Megan Campbell/Kirkland Reporter

Helping local ‘heroes’ find a home on the Eastside

Stacey Porter, 34, teaches music and technology in Kirkland.

For the last year, she’s been looking for a home on the Eastside that was close to her two children’s schools and within proximity to her work.

On a teacher’s salary, it was hard to find a place that met her needs and didn’t cost more than $600,000.

“I looked at so many homes,” she said. “Each one of them had a different price. Each one of them was more than it was worth.”

Thankfully, she met Scott Sullivan, an Eastside realtor who told her about the Homes for Heroes program, which provides savings for local “heroes” like her.

Homes for Heroes, Inc., founded shortly after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, helps “heroes” — firefighters, law enforcement, military (active, reserves and veterans), health care professionals and teachers — save on home purchases.

Homes for Heroes is made up of the “largest nationwide network of affiliate real estate specialists and local business affiliates” committed to helping “heroes of our nation” save on a home and on home-related purchases, according to its website.

Sullivan helped Porter find a two-bedroom condo in Kirkland for about $250,000.

Once more, by using Sullivan, a Homes for Heroes affiliate, Porter saved nearly $2,000.

That savings is going toward Porter’s continuing education costs.

“It was really great,” she said.

It’s the first home Porter has owned on her own. As a single mother on a teacher’s salary, it means a lot that Homes for Heroes helped her save on a house.

“In the end, it was a really simple process,” she said.

Porter was the first hero Sullivan has helped.

Sullivan, along with his partner Mark Friedrich, a local loan officer, is building a local network of Homes for Heroes affiliates.

So far they have a home inspector and moving company willing to give a discount for heroes too.

“If they want to use all the affiliates then they can save more,” Sullivan said.

For Friedrich, becoming a Homes for Heroes affiliate was a “heart thing.”

Friedrich, who has two sons in the U.S. Marines, said participating in Homes for Heroes is the way he can give back to those who give so much for this country.

Sullivan agreed with Friedrich.

The two became Homes for Heroes affiliates last year.

The two say it’s about recognizing this group of people for the job and sacrifices they do and make every day. They want them to know it’s a big deal.

“This is business with a heart,” Friedrich said.

Right now, finding a home on the Eastside is a rough business.

“We’re hovering right around a month of inventory,” Sullivan said. “It’s a total seller’s market…Prices are skyrocketing and there’s no inventory.”

This makes it a challenge to compete in this market.

So getting 25-30 percent off a home is a huge deal. Sullivan said that for about $100,000 spent, it is about $700 saved off the closing price.

Friedrich gives about $800 right off the top of his services.

Sullivan and Friedrich want to help more heroes on the Eastside find their new homes and save.

Contact Sullivan at (904) 327-5676 or ScottSullivan1@mac.com. Contact Friedrich at (425) 330-5226 or mark.friedrich@apmortgage.com.

For more information on Homes for Heroes, Inc., visit www.homesforheroes.com.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@kirklandreporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.kirklandreporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in News

The nose of the 500th 787 Dreamliner at the assembly plant in Everett on Sept. 21, 2016. (Kevin Clark / Herald, file)
Report: Boeing will end 787 Dreamliner production in Everett

Boeing declined comment on a Wall Street Journal story saying the passenger jet’s assembly will move to South Carolina.

Washington State Capitol Building in Olympia. File photo
Surge in consumer spending eases state budget challenges

A jump in tax collections cuts a projected $9 billion shortfall in half, acccording to new forecast.

High speed rail and hub cities explored in Cascadia Corridor study

A new paper outlines a potential plan for the region.

Should state cover school bus costs if there are no riders?

With funding tied to getting students to school, districts are uncertain how much money they’ll receive.

The truck of the Renton family as it was found Tuesday. While fleeing the Cold Springs Fire two adults were severely burned and one toddler died. Courtesy photo/Okanogan Sheriff’s Office
Toddler killed as Renton family flees Cold Springs Fire

The parents were severely burned and are being treated at Harborview Medical Center

A plane drops fire retardant on the Palmer Mountain Fire last week. The fire is listed as 84 percent contained, and fully lined. Laura Knowlton/Sound Publishing staff photo
Threat multiplier: How climate change, coronavirus and weather are scorching WA

Dry summer conspired with the pandemic and a wind storm.

Screenshot from the state Employment Security Department’s website at esd.wa.gov.
Workers may qualify for an extra $1,500 in unemployment back pay

A federal program will give some of the state’s unemployed a $300 weekly bump for the past five weeks.

King County moves to Stage 2 burn ban

Outdoor fires, even barbecues or in fire pits, are now prohibited.

Image courtesy of the Washington Department of Natural Resources.
Massive wildfires incinerate WA

All state Department of Natural Resources lands were closed to recreational activities on Sept. 8.

Screenshot of the air quality monitor at 11 a.m., Tuesday, Sept. 8. Courtesy Puget Sound Clean Air Agency.
King County faces unhealthy air quality due to wildfire smoke

Weather monitors recommend people limit time outdoors, especially children, seniors and those with heart or lung disease.

Amazon adds more office space to Bellevue, now as many new jobs as HQ2

The office space for an additional 10,000 jobs, making it 25,000 coming to downtown, is expected to complete in 2023.