Stacey Porter sits with her two children, Isaac, 9, and Lucy, 7, in their new home. Megan Campbell/Kirkland Reporter

Stacey Porter sits with her two children, Isaac, 9, and Lucy, 7, in their new home. Megan Campbell/Kirkland Reporter

Helping local ‘heroes’ find a home on the Eastside

Stacey Porter, 34, teaches music and technology in Kirkland.

For the last year, she’s been looking for a home on the Eastside that was close to her two children’s schools and within proximity to her work.

On a teacher’s salary, it was hard to find a place that met her needs and didn’t cost more than $600,000.

“I looked at so many homes,” she said. “Each one of them had a different price. Each one of them was more than it was worth.”

Thankfully, she met Scott Sullivan, an Eastside realtor who told her about the Homes for Heroes program, which provides savings for local “heroes” like her.

Homes for Heroes, Inc., founded shortly after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, helps “heroes” — firefighters, law enforcement, military (active, reserves and veterans), health care professionals and teachers — save on home purchases.

Homes for Heroes is made up of the “largest nationwide network of affiliate real estate specialists and local business affiliates” committed to helping “heroes of our nation” save on a home and on home-related purchases, according to its website.

Sullivan helped Porter find a two-bedroom condo in Kirkland for about $250,000.

Once more, by using Sullivan, a Homes for Heroes affiliate, Porter saved nearly $2,000.

That savings is going toward Porter’s continuing education costs.

“It was really great,” she said.

It’s the first home Porter has owned on her own. As a single mother on a teacher’s salary, it means a lot that Homes for Heroes helped her save on a house.

“In the end, it was a really simple process,” she said.

Porter was the first hero Sullivan has helped.

Sullivan, along with his partner Mark Friedrich, a local loan officer, is building a local network of Homes for Heroes affiliates.

So far they have a home inspector and moving company willing to give a discount for heroes too.

“If they want to use all the affiliates then they can save more,” Sullivan said.

For Friedrich, becoming a Homes for Heroes affiliate was a “heart thing.”

Friedrich, who has two sons in the U.S. Marines, said participating in Homes for Heroes is the way he can give back to those who give so much for this country.

Sullivan agreed with Friedrich.

The two became Homes for Heroes affiliates last year.

The two say it’s about recognizing this group of people for the job and sacrifices they do and make every day. They want them to know it’s a big deal.

“This is business with a heart,” Friedrich said.

Right now, finding a home on the Eastside is a rough business.

“We’re hovering right around a month of inventory,” Sullivan said. “It’s a total seller’s market…Prices are skyrocketing and there’s no inventory.”

This makes it a challenge to compete in this market.

So getting 25-30 percent off a home is a huge deal. Sullivan said that for about $100,000 spent, it is about $700 saved off the closing price.

Friedrich gives about $800 right off the top of his services.

Sullivan and Friedrich want to help more heroes on the Eastside find their new homes and save.

Contact Sullivan at (904) 327-5676 or ScottSullivan1@mac.com. Contact Friedrich at (425) 330-5226 or mark.friedrich@apmortgage.com.

For more information on Homes for Heroes, Inc., visit www.homesforheroes.com.


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