Kailan Manandic/staff photo                                Officials break ground outside Salt House Church for the Eastside’s first permanent women and family shelter. Workers hope to complete construction in 2020.

Kailan Manandic/staff photo Officials break ground outside Salt House Church for the Eastside’s first permanent women and family shelter. Workers hope to complete construction in 2020.

Eastside’s first permanent shelter breaks ground in Kirkland

The shelter will serve single women and families with children who are experiencing homelessness.

Shovels struck the earth in celebration of an Eastside-wide partnership that brought residents, nonprofits, cities and King County together in an effort to assist families and women in need.

The Eastside’s first and only permanent shelter for women and families broke ground in Kirkland on the evening of April 10 and will eventually serve locals experiencing homelessness. The two-story, 19,000 square feet facility will provide 100 beds, housing and supportive case management, shower and laundry facilities, medical services and a general safe space 24 hours a day, seven days a week throughout the year.

“I am so thrilled to be here with all of you for this incredible occasion,” Kirkland Mayor Penny Sweet said. “This project is the result of unprecedented collaboration by nonprofits, faith communities, city, county and state governments, and the community.”

Kirkland Mayor Penny Sweet gives her remarks at the groundbreaking celebration for the Eastside’s first permanent women and family shelter. The shelter is funded by community support, King County, Kirkland and Washington state. Kailan Manandic/staff photo

Kirkland Mayor Penny Sweet gives her remarks at the groundbreaking celebration for the Eastside’s first permanent women and family shelter. The shelter is funded by community support, King County, Kirkland and Washington state. Kailan Manandic/staff photo

The shelter was first conceived in 2016 when the city of Kirkland began discussing a permanent facility to serve adult women and children experiencing homelessness.

The partnership includes the New Bethlehem Project, which includes Holy Family Catholic Church in Kirkland, St. Louise Catholic Church in Bellevue, Catholic Community Services (CCS) and Salt House Lutheran Church.

The project has seen wide-spread support, securing more than $9 million in funding from various communities, nonprofits and government entities.

The city of Kirkland will contribute $1.15 million; King County will contribute a total of $5.2 million, $2.5 million of which will come through its veterans, seniors and human services levy and through a community development block grant; the state will contribute $2.35 million; A Regional Coalition for Housing (ARCH) will contribute $504,406; and private donations from the Eastside community, particularly Holy Family Church, St. Louise Church and donors from The Sophia Way will contribute $2.1 million and continue to fund shelter operations.

“The 24-hour services are really critical to helping people get back momentum in their lives…Today, we are breaking ground for a new permanent location, which is cause for a real celebration,” said King County Executive Dow Constantine at the event. “King County is proud to be a partner in the regional shelter effort…We are able to invest $2.7 million to help build the shelter and the levy will also provide an additional $2.5 million in operating and services funding because we know a warm safe bed is an extremely important thing for people but so too is access to onsite supportive services.”

King County Executive Dow Constantine gives his remarks at the groundbreaking celebration for the Eastside’s first permanent women and family shelter. The shelter is funded by community support, King County, Kirkland and Washington state. Kailan Manandic/staff photo

King County Executive Dow Constantine gives his remarks at the groundbreaking celebration for the Eastside’s first permanent women and family shelter. The shelter is funded by community support, King County, Kirkland and Washington state. Kailan Manandic/staff photo

Salt House Church has offered up space to host the facility and in a groundbreaking celebration, various church officials, community members and local government leaders and workers gathered at the church. Everyone involved had an opportunity to help dig up the first patch of dirt as onlookers cheered.

The land was secured in a 2017 Memorandum of Understanding between Holy Spirit Lutheran Church, Salt House Church and the city of Kirkland. The city purchased the property and leased it out to CCS. Salt House will also help support the neighboring shelter and the women and children it will serve.

Kailan Manandic/staff photo                                Officials break ground outside Salt House Church for the Eastside’s first permanent women and family shelter. Workers hope to complete construction in 2020.

Kailan Manandic/staff photo Officials break ground outside Salt House Church for the Eastside’s first permanent women and family shelter. Workers hope to complete construction in 2020.

Workers hope to finish construction in 2020.

“So this is how we will be successful in creating the emergency and the long-term housing and services we need to give every person in our communities the opportunity to reclaim their health, their security [and] their dignity,” Constantine said. “So I look forward to coming back with you, madam mayor, and cutting the ribbon this fantastic new opportunity for our community.”

The Sophia Way and CCS’s New Bethlehem Project will occupy the new facility, offering their various services to any woman or family who need the help. The Sophia Way will serve single adult women on the facility’s second floor while the New Bethlehem Project will serve families with children on the first floor.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@kirklandreporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.kirklandreporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

Kailan Manandic/staff photo                                Officials break ground outside Salt House Church for the Eastside’s first permanent women and family shelter. Workers hope to complete construction in 2020.

Kailan Manandic/staff photo Officials break ground outside Salt House Church for the Eastside’s first permanent women and family shelter. Workers hope to complete construction in 2020.

Community members join local government leaders, church officials and workers at the Salt House Church in Kirkland to celebrate the shelter groundbreaking. Locals were able to see designs for the shelter and ask questions of staff. Kailan Manandic/staff photo

Community members join local government leaders, church officials and workers at the Salt House Church in Kirkland to celebrate the shelter groundbreaking. Locals were able to see designs for the shelter and ask questions of staff. Kailan Manandic/staff photo

More in News

National Guard troops, pictured Jan. 11 at the state Capitol in Olympia, have been on standby in case of violent protests. (Photo by Roger Harnack, Cheney Free Press)
At the state Capitol, a quiet day amid heightened security

There were no protests or arrests as troopers patrolled and the National Guard assumed a lower profile.

West Point Treatment Plant in Seattle. Photo courtesy of King County
Power outages cause massive wastewater spill into Puget Sound, Lake Washington

King County estimates millions gallons of untreated wastewater overflowed into surrounding waters.

Democrats in the Washington State House are proposing to pay for transportation improvements partly by raising the gas tax by 18 cents. (Sound Publishing file photo)
House Democrats lay out massive $26B transportation package funded by gas tax hike

An 18-cent gas tax increase and a fee on carbon emissions would fund new roads and more.

File photo
Report: 70 percent of gun deaths in Washington are attributable to suicide

Research done at The Firearm Injury and Policy Research Program at Harborview… Continue reading

June 2018 algae bloom. Photo courtesy of Department of Ecology
Human-caused ‘dead zones’ threaten health of Puget Sound

Wastewater treatment plants account for about 70% of the excess nutrients.

Robert Allen, 61, had never been homeless in his life before 2019, when he lost his housing. The chef has been trying to get back on his feet, and hopes to open a nonprofit and make hot sauce. File photo
King County implements 0.01% sales tax to raise money for housing the homeless

Officials plan to buy hotels, motels and nursing homes for conversion into permanent housing.

Teaser
Social media site Parler returns after registering with Sammamish company

The right-wing social media website is not being hosted by Epik, but registered its domain.

Local restaurants have had to adapt to new rules during the COVID pandemic. Pictured: JP’s Tavern in Federal Way’s turkey club sandwich with a side of tater tots. File photo
State lawmakers propose bill to fast-track the governor’s reopening plan

Bill’s sponsors want to give legislature control over COVID-19 restrictions.

Fentanyl. (Courtesy photo)
King County reports record numbers of drug overdose deaths

Preliminary toxicology testing shows most overdose victims used multiple types of drugs.

Most Read