Caller upset over dog defecating on lawn | Police Blotter

Caller upset over dog defecating on lawn | Police Blotter

Police blotter for June 27 - July 4.

  • Tuesday, July 16, 2019 3:17pm
  • News

June 27

Defecating dog: At 2:59 p.m. in the 9200 block of Northeast 135th Street, it was reported that a couple lets their dog defecate on their neighbor’s lawn and driveway and never cleans it up. When the neighbor sees the couple walking their blue pitbull he never sees any doggy bags with them either.

June 28

Disposing of a gun: At 9:21 a.m. in the 6800 block of Northeast 129th Street, a resident turned their firearm over to police for destruction. It was unwanted.

June 29

Road rage: At 2 p.m. in the 700 block of 116th Avenue Northeast, an Acura driver was backing up in the parking lot and almost hit another occupied car. The nearly hit subject used his horn and drove past the driver. The Acura driver flipped the honker off and followed him for a couple miles.

Unwanted touch: At 5:41 p.m. in the 8600 block of 120th Avenue Northeast, a pair (male and female) was standing in line at the food court when a subject cut between them to get to the garbage can. When the subject finished at the garbage can, she allegedly created contact between her chest and the back of the man’s arm. The woman involved in the physical touch believed that the man deliberately blocked her, leaving his arm out to touch her chest.

Lights off: At 6:03 p.m. in the 12600 block of 116th Avenue Northeast, harassing phone calls were coming in from someone claiming to be from the lighting company. They threatened to turn the lights off. They called the front desk of the Aegis Lodge multiple times. Subjects receiving the calls were unable to block them. The reporting person said the caller “sounded like a foreigner.”

That’s my mail: At 10:17 p.m. in the 11300 block of Northeast 129th Court, someone called police after they saw their neighbor shining her cell phone flashlight into the caller’s open mailbox. The neighbor was confronted, showed the caller the mail in her hands, and then went inside her home. The reporting person never saw the neighbor take anything and was not missing any mail that she knew of. The caller was not happy that police “could not do anything about the crime that never occurred.”

July 1

Google Hangouts gone wrong: At 12:49 a.m. in the 9500 block of Northeast 141st Place, a man engaged in a “consensual virtual sexual experience” via Google Hangouts with an unknown woman he met on an online dating app. During their video chat, the man realized the woman was recording him. The unknown female demanded $200 or the video would be leaked onto the world wide web.

My spot: At 12:45 p.m. in the 11200 block of Northeast 124th Street, a person was assaulted inside the QFC market. He was punched with a closed fist. The punch happened over a confrontation over parking.

July 4

Port-a-potty patriotism: At 9:16 p.m. in the 1300 block of 6th Street, there were three teens lighting fireworks in a port-a-potty. One was wearing a white hoodie, the other was in a black hoodie. They drove off in a white Range Rover.

Fireworks: At 11:28 p.m. in the 9500 block of 130th Avenue Northeast, someone called to report that there were some teens “about to do fireworks.” They had just pulled in to the back lot with a small sedan.


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