Coldwell Banker Bain’s monthly dinners are held at the Velocity apartment community on the second Tuesday of each month, during which they provide residents with a healthy dinner, interacting with and feeding between 30 and 50 people. Courtesy photo

Coldwell Banker Bain’s monthly dinners are held at the Velocity apartment community on the second Tuesday of each month, during which they provide residents with a healthy dinner, interacting with and feeding between 30 and 50 people. Courtesy photo

Coldwell Banker Bain launches monthly dinners for Imagine Housing’s Velocity community

Office brokers and staff establish support for affordable housing services.

  • Wednesday, November 14, 2018 8:30am
  • Life

The brokers of Coldwell Banker Bain of Kirkland have launched a monthly event supporting the residents of the Velocity apartment community in south Kirkland.

On the second Tuesday of each month, brokers and staff provide Velocity residents with a healthy dinner, interacting with and feeding between 30 and 50 people.

Velocity, a new Imagine Housing apartment community located near the South Kirkland Park and Ride, offers 58 studio, one-bedroom, two-bedroom and three-bedroom homes to individuals and households who have incomes of less than 60 percent of the area’s median income.

“This has become such a wonderful experience for the office,” Rich Whitehill, a broker in the CB Bain Kirkland office, said about visiting Velocity. “Each month, the effort grows and we’re now seeing a bit of ‘competition’ between the brokers and staff as they work to outdo each other with their cooking skills. It’s a great way for us to meet community members, help address affordable housing and build relationships.”

Jim Kallerson, the office’s principal managing broker added, “Affordable housing is a critical issue that directly relates to our business. These events provide us the opportunity to give back to those in our community who have been affected by and excluded from the private market, given increasing home prices. Imagine Housing does remarkable work in the Eastside community to help those affected and we couldn’t be prouder to support its efforts.”

Not only do residents benefit from a tasty and healthy meal during these events, the events also free up Imagine Housing and Velocity staff so that they can participate and fully engage with CB Bain staff and residents in order to address any specific needs.

“Volunteering has a huge impact on our services and also serves to provide community members with a first-hand look at affordable housing,” said Derek Delvalle, Imagine Housing’s director of supportive services. “It humanizes the affordable housing crisis for community members who don’t come face to face with it every day.”

Kathryn Jacoby, community engagement coordinator for the organization added, “During these dinners our staff is able to connect with residents and spend more time providing case management and resources, given they don’t have to cook and serve. It truly is a wonderful service to our residents and staff and it’s a joy to see the brokers and residents establish mutual respect and relationships.”

Velocity is one of 14 Imagine Housing-owned and managed communities in east King County, home to more than 1,200 people whose income is less than 60 percent of the area’s median income. Residents include families, veterans, single parents, youth and adults who have been homeless, survivors of domestic violence, and people on a fixed income due to age, health, or disability. Community apartments provide individuals and families a place to live near their jobs, good schools, transportation and health services.

Volunteers at Imagine Housing have many opportunities to help the organization achieve its mission. Volunteers help cook community meals, deliver basic needs supplies to residents, write letters to elected officials, and assist staff with key projects. To learn more, visit www.imaginehousing.org.

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