A rendering of what the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe’s new 18-story, 400-room hotel resort will look like when it is expected to open in 2021, next to its main casino in Auburn. COURTESY IMAGE, Tribe/Smarthouse Creative

A rendering of what the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe’s new 18-story, 400-room hotel resort will look like when it is expected to open in 2021, next to its main casino in Auburn. COURTESY IMAGE, Tribe/Smarthouse Creative

State Department of Commerce announces $5 million emergency response grant for tribes

All tribal communities across the state will have access to funding to help with COVID-19 response

The Washington State Department of Commerce announced on Thursday $5 million in emergency grants is now available to the 29 federally recognized tribes in the state to bolster their response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“These funds are immediately accessible to tribal governments coping with severe impacts from the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Commerce Director Lisa Brown in a Commerce news release. “From food distribution and isolation housing to medical equipment and services for vulnerable members, the grants will strengthen tribal communities all across the state.”

Each tribal government will receive an immediate grant of $100,000, with the remaining $2.1 million distributed based on a formula currently under development between Commerce and tribal leaders.

Eligible expenses and activities covered under the grant include but are not limited to:

* Costs to address public health needs in response to the COVID-19 outbreak and its impacts

* The creation and operation of isolation and quarantine housing

* Costs associated with the increased demand for social programs, such as elder care services, food distribution or behavioral health services

* Costs associated with assisting people experiencing homelessness or housing instability and needing physical distancing and other preventative measures

* Procurement of health care equipment, including telehealth equipment and licenses

* Unemployment match required under the federal CARES Act

* Purchase of personal protective equipment (PPE), cleaning and sanitation supplies

* Costs related to COVID -19 testing

* Other expenses in agreement with the Department of Commerce

“COVID-19 knows no political, geographic or cultural boundaries,” said Commerce tribal liaison Ernie Rasmussen. “This government-to-government effort to combat the impacts of COVID-19 is a testament to the human partnership necessary to succeed in our attempts to return every community to normalcy as quickly as possible.”

“The COVID-19 crisis is having disastrous impacts on tribes throughout the state,” said W. Ron Allen, Jamestown S’Klallam Tribal chair and CEO. “While other states are leaving tribes to fend for themselves, Washington is partnering to distribute state coronavirus relief funds to help mitigate the pandemic’s impact to our tribal governments and communities. We are deeply appreciative of this assistance.”


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@kirklandreporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.kirklandreporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in Northwest

Whole Foods grocery store entrance (Shutterstock)
King County could pass grocery store worker hazard pay next week

The King County Metropolitan Council will vote during its next meeting on… Continue reading

FILE - This Dec. 2, 2020, file photo provided by Johnson & Johnson shows vials of the COVID-19 vaccine in the United States. The U.S. is getting a third vaccine to prevent COVID-19, as the Food and Drug Administration on Saturday, Feb. 27, 2021 cleared a Johnson & Johnson shot that works with just one dose instead of two  (Johnson & Johnson)
Inslee OKs use of single-shot Johnson & Johnson vaccine

The governor acted after receiving the recommendation of a scientific panel enlisted by Western states.

Freshwater variety of kokanee salmon from Lake Sammamish. File photo
Encouraging numbers for kokanee salmon spawn count

Lake Sammamish kokanee aren’t out of the woods by any stretch, but… Continue reading

In this file photo, Tayshon Cottrell dons his graduation cap and gown, along with a face mask reading: “Wear it! Save America” at Todd Beamer High School’s virtual graduation walk recording on May 20, 2020, in Federal Way. Olivia Sullivan/Sound Publishing
Law gives Washington high school seniors leeway to graduate

Gov. Jay Inslee signed a bill that can waive some requirements for students who were on track before the pandemic.

File photo
Study shows Washingtonians exceeded ‘heavy drinking’ threshold in 2020

The survey suggests Washingtonians drank more than 17 alcoholic beverages a week on average.

Mercer Island School District first-graders returned to in-person classes on Jan. 19, 2021. Here, Northwood Elementary School students head into the building. Photo courtesy of the Mercer Island School District
Governor: Educators are now eligible for coronavirus vaccine

“This should give educators more confidence,” Jay Inslee said. Other frontline workers could soon be next.

Malden, after a wildfire burned down 80% of the town’s buildings in Eastern Washington. Courtesy photo
DNR commissioner seeks $125 million to fight wildfires

In Washington state last September, some 600,000 acres burned within 72 hours.

Stock photo
First-time home buyers increasingly priced out of Washington housing market

Building Industry Association of Washington says state’s median home price is $522,023

t
King County Elections seeks better voter turnout in historically excluded communities

$950,000 in grants to be distributed over next two years to groups

Most Read