Metro RapidRide to end with Totem Lake following alternate Redmond proposal

Metro RapidRide to end with Totem Lake following alternate Redmond proposal

Metro officials say they are moving forward with long-range plan.

The intended north-end terminus for the impending Kirkland-Bellevue-Eastgate RapidRide continues to be Totem Lake after downtown Redmond was briefly considered as an alternative following feedback from the North Eastside Mobility Project (NEMP).

At a July 24 Kirkland City Council meeting, representatives from King County Metro said there were some advantages to the proposed Redmond alignment. But after conducting an internal analysis that was not detailed at the event, it was ultimately concluded that there were not enough advantages to inspire a shift from the preferred Totem Lake Metro Connects terminus.

“While we always welcome input from partner cities, input from the city of Kirkland was not a determining factor in making this decision,” Hannah McIntosh, Metro’s program manager for RapidRide, said in response to a recent article from the Seattle Transit Blog stating that it was a result of pressure. “It was really an internal review of our long-range plan, just to be sure there wasn’t anything we missed. The conclusion was that there wasn’t and that we’re moving forward consistently with our long-range plan.”

McIntosh added that Totem Lake has always been preferred because of the region’s high-ridership corridor with a growing demand, and because it’s a focus of growth for the city of Kirkland.

“Metro worked closely with Kirkland staff during this process and did not state an opinion about which route was preferred,” Kirkland’s city communications manager Kellie Stickney said in an email. “Rather, they used their data-driven process to inform this decision.”

Redmond will be further accessible via the March 2020 service charge, whose Metro 250 route will include Bellevue-Kirkland buses to Redmond. The public had previously expressed that they wanted to see better Kirkland-Redmond connections through NEMP outreach, which was what led Metro to consider Redmond as a potential RapidRide endpoint in the first place.

Metro will hold meetings in the fall to allow the public an opportunity to share suggestions for the Kirkland-Bellevue-Eastgate RapidRide, which is slated to open in March 2025.

“We are really eager to get out and have conversations with folks about the best way to connect downtown Kirkland to Totem Lake,” McIntosh said.

King County Metro and staff will continue to update the city council as the implementation of RapidRide 1027 progresses as well as any other relevant impacts to the North Eastside Mobility Project. There will be additional public outreach in the future. The project, which is estimated to cost about $90 million and which anticipates federal grant applications in 2020, is currently about 50 percent funded.




In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@kirklandreporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.kirklandreporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in News

Chris Fagan trekking across Antarctica in 2014. Contributed by Chris Fagan
South Pole or Bust

The story of a North Bend couple who trekked across Antarctica.

King County Council has nine members who each represent a district. Courtesy of kingcounty.gov
King County Council passes $12.59 billion biennial budget

King County Council on Nov. 17 passed a $12.59 billion biennial budget… Continue reading

pexels
EvergreenHealth receives stroke care certification

The hospital system was able to demonstrate quality care and an advanced stroke program

State Sen. Mark Mullet (D-Issaquah) authored the letter to Gov. Jay Inslee. Mullet represents the 5th Legislative District. File photo
Democratic lawmakers ask Inslee to lift ban on indoor dining

They want to try to scaling back on occupancy before forcing an end to inside service.

Tim Eyman get in some last minute campaigning for I-976 in downtown Bellevue on the afternoon of Nov. 5, 2019. File photo
Eyman fights allegation he repeatedly broke campaign laws

In a lawsuit, the state accuses the prolific initiative promoter of getting kickbacks.

Kabal Gill, owner of East India Grill in Federal Way, wears gloves to hand over take-out orders at his restaurant. File photo
State halts indoor service at bars, restaurants, home guests

Amid soaring new coronavirus cases and an overburdened health care system, the state’s clamping down.

Screenshot from Gov. Jay Inslee’s news conference Nov. 12 with his wife, Trudi.
Inslee to hold news conference to announce new restrictions

Among them, reportedly, will be a ban on indoor service at restaurants and retail limitations.

Aaron Kunkler/staff photoAlvin Sweet is a resident of Martin Court in Seattle’s Georgetown neighborhood. Martin Court is a former motel which was transformed into a supportive housing complex two decades ago. New funding from King County’s Health through Housing ordinance could expand this type of program across the county.
King County wants to buy motels for emergency, affordable housing

The concept has proven results in addressing homelessness.

Say Their Names display at St. John’s Episcopal Church at 105 State St. S, Kirkland. Courtesy Photo/Morgan Petroski Photography
Kirkland churches display Say Their Names memorial

The public display is part of a nationwide memorial campaign out of Portland, Oregon.

Most Read