Kirkland City Hall

Kirkland City Hall

Kirkland City Council passes resolution in support of I-1639

  • Wednesday, September 26, 2018 8:30am
  • News

On Sept. 18, the Kirkland City Council approved Resolution R-5334, a resolution supporting Initiative 1639, concerning firearms.

The resolution in support of I-1639 was approved after a public hearing during which council members heard from residents on both sides of the issue. I-1639 would require increased background checks, training, age limitations and waiting periods for sales or delivery of semiautomatic assault rifles. It would also criminalize noncompliant storage upon unauthorized use, allow fees and enact other provisions. The discussion of the resolution came after a series of nine focus groups and a town hall meeting on gun safety with more than 200 attendees. After hearing from the public during the town hall, the City Council directed city staff to investigate the pros and cons of I-1639 and to schedule a public hearing on a resolution in support of the measure.

“Kirkland must continue to show leadership around gun safety,” said Mayor Amy Walen in a press release. “Approving the Resolution in Support of Initiative Measure No. 1639 was an important demonstration of our commitment to do everything we can do protect our children and our community.”

The resolution is one of a series of initiatives council is pursuing as part of the police strategic plan, the 2019-20 budget process and the community conversation on gun safety. The most comprehensive of these actions was the development of an Enhanced Police Services and Community Safety Ballot Measure — Proposition 1. The police services and community safety sales tax ballot measure will be put to Kirkland voters as part of the Nov. 6 general election.

To find more information on the ballot measure, or to view the full-text of the resolution, visit the city website.

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