In Brief

The Kirkland-based East Lake Washington Audubon Society (ELWAS) last week announced its new board of directors for 2008. Serving for the next year are: Christy Anderson, president; Cindy Balbuena, vice president; Ellen Homan, treasurer; Carmen Almodovar, secretary; Tricia Kishel, Margaret Lie and Helen LaBouy, at-large Board Members, Brian Bell, birding chair; Tim McGruder, conservation chair; Mary Britton-Simmons, education chair; and Sunny Walter, membership chair.

  • Monday, April 7, 2008 7:24pm
  • News

Local Audubon elects new board for 2008

The Kirkland-based East Lake Washington Audubon Society (ELWAS) last week announced its new board of directors for 2008. Serving for the next year are: Christy Anderson, president; Cindy Balbuena, vice president; Ellen Homan, treasurer; Carmen Almodovar, secretary; Tricia Kishel, Margaret Lie and Helen LaBouy, at-large Board Members, Brian Bell, birding chair; Tim McGruder, conservation chair; Mary Britton-Simmons, education chair; and Sunny Walter, membership chair.

The Audubon also recognized its 2007 environmentalists of the year, John Schmied and Marie Hartford.

Hartford, a teacher at Thoreau Elementary School, integrates ecology study into her classroom to promote a better understanding of the natural world and a greater sense of stewardship. This year Marie is also working with sixth graders who ask teachers to reduce their annual classroom’s CO2 emissions by 2,000 pounds.

John, a teacher at Skyview Junior High, uses curriculum focused on the investigative process using human and environmental health themes. For the past three years, he’s served as project manager for the Skyview Outdoor Environmental Learning Center. With private donations and over 5000 hours of community service, John established a wetland area for birds and breeding amphibians at the center’s 5.5 acres, located on school property in partnership with the Washington Trails Association.

Kirklander named dean of music school

Lawrence University of Appleton, Wisc., has named Kirkland resident Brian Pertl as dean of its conservatory of music. He will join the Lawrence administration July 1.

Pertl, who will leave a job at Microsoft to take the position, serves as a Washington state music scholar for the Smithsonian Institution’s Museum on Main Street traveling exhibit “New Harmonies: Celebrating American Roots Music.” He has also been a lecturer for Washington’s “Inquiring Mind Lecture Series” for the past 16 years, delivering more than 300 talks on a wide variety of subjects at venues throughout the state.

KITH welcomes new executive director

Kirkland Interfaith Transitions in Housing (KITH) has announced Jan Dickerman as its new executive director.

Dickerman joins KITH with 20 years of experience in human services as the Housing and Child Development Director for Hopelink. A long-time Eastside resident, she will direct an organization focused on working with the community to eliminate homelessness.

The KITH board of directors will host an open house to welcome Dickerman and introduce her to the community on Thursday, April 17, from 5-7 p.m. at Northlake Unitarian Universalist Church, 308 4th Ave. South in Kirkland.


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