Amy Falcone announces run for Kirkland City Council. Courtesy photo

Amy Falcone announces run for Kirkland City Council. Courtesy photo

Falcone announces run for Kirkland City Council

She is focused on inclusivity, smart growth and community safety.

  • Wednesday, March 6, 2019 2:45pm
  • News

Amy Falcone, human services commissioner and Finn Hill Neighborhood Alliance board member announced her intention to run for Kirkland City Council, Pos. 6, in this year’s election.

“This is the time to shape Kirkland’s future for generations to come,” Falcone in a press release. “Investments we make today will ensure Kirkland will be an inclusive, dynamic community, providing opportunities to live, work and play for all our future citizens.”

Falcone was one of the finalists for former Mayor Amy Walen’s vacated seat. According to the release, Falcone is endorsed by both retiring Kirkland City Councilmember Dave Asher and now Rep. Walen of the 48th Legislative District.

“As a human services commissioner, Falcone’s ability to see opportunities and passionately advocate for progress has already greatly benefited our city, and she will make even greater contributions on the city council.” Asher said in the release.

Walen added in the release, “Amy’s unique perspective as a special needs parent and her passion for ensuring that Kirkland is a welcoming and inclusive place for everyone shines through in her work every day. From advocating for more affordable housing to recommending additional resources for individuals with disabilities living in our city — she genuinely cares about the people of Kirkland.”

As a PTSA board president for Henry David Thoreau Elementary School and Finn Hill Neighborhood Alliance board member, Falcone represents the voices of busy Kirkland families, the release states. She has long advocated for maintaining the character of Kirkland’s neighborhoods and for increasing the city’s walkability during this time of unprecedented growth, according to the release.

“Amy’s leadership in the Lake Washington School District and [PTSA] has been integral in creating safer walk-to-school routes in her community and enacting positive change for students in special needs programs,” said LWSD board member Cassandra Sage in the release. “Both efforts will benefit families for years to come.”

In addition, Falcone’s extensive volunteerism and previous work as a researcher provided her with a solid foundation in managing to budget, the release states.

“Amy has shown strength in stewardship of local tax dollars in her work on Kirkland’s Human Services Commission. I am confident she will carry this over into strong fiscal responsibility on City Council,” said Kirkland Human Services Commission chair Kimberly Scott in the release.

Falcone spent more than a decade in social science research before moving to Kirkland, the release states. She earned her master of arts degree in sociology and bachelor of arts degree in biology from Temple University, where she also taught an undergraduate statistics class. She currently lives in the Finn Hill neighborhood with her husband and their three young children.

To learn more about Amy Falcone, visit her Facebook page at www.facebook.com/AmyFalconeForKirklandCityCouncil or her at www.AmyFalcone.org.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@kirklandreporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.kirklandreporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in News

King County assessor wants Legislature to fix laws to help small businesses

Changes needed because of COVID-19 impact on commercial properties

King County could be in Phase 2 in two weeks

The county is also hoping the state lets them reopen several businesses by Friday.

Exterior Kirkland City Hall. Blake Peterson/staff photo
City: Businesses in downtown, other commercial areas encouraged to remain closed through June 2

Update: Phase 1 businesses are now encouraged to reopen but remain vigilant.

Downtown Kirkland. Staff photo/Blake Peterson
Update: Kirkland officials strongly encouraging residents to stay out of downtown area, waterfront parks after 1 p.m.

The recommendations are in response to a potential protest in Downtown Kirkland at 2 p.m.

Businesses asked to close by 1 p.m., visitors to avoid commercial shopping areas

The City of Kirkland states it has received reports of being a possible target for looting

Downtown Kirkland. Blake Peterson/staff photo
How is COVID-19 impacting Kirkland?

King County has released city-specific data on case rates, unemployment filings and more.

Kabal Gill, owner of East India Grill in Federal Way, wears gloves to hand over take-out orders at his restaurant on March 23. File photo
New guidelines for Phase 2 reopenings in King County

All workers will need to wear masks as restaurants, retail shops and other businesses reopen.

This undated file photo provided by U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows CDC’s laboratory test kit for the new coronavirus. Courtesy photo
Inslee wants nursing home residents and staff tested by June 12

Governor says state will pay for test kits and personal protective equipment.

Most Read