Crossing Kirkland participants park their bikes at one of the stations along the Cross Kirkland Corridor during the second annual event on Sept. 8. Katie Metzger/staff photo

Crossing Kirkland participants park their bikes at one of the stations along the Cross Kirkland Corridor during the second annual event on Sept. 8. Katie Metzger/staff photo

Citywide block party ‘Crossing Kirkland’ connects community

Residents got to walk, bike, eat and meet on the Cross Kirkland Corridor.

For the second year in a row, the entire Kirkland community was invited to a citywide block party along the Cross Kirkland Corridor called “Crossing Kirkland” on Sept. 8.

The event is designed and put on by neighbors. It consisted of six stations, stretching from Feriton Spur (Google) in the south up to Northeast 112th Avenue (Gold’s Gym) in the north.

Each station was hosted by a different neighborhood, with a variety of activities. LimeBikes were available at the bookend stations, the Rotary Club spoke about the railway history at one station, and KirklandReads promoted their citywide book club at another. There were also HAM radio and CERT demonstrations, along with face painting, T-shirt sales and more.

Crossing Kirkland debuted in 2017, drawing more than 1,500 visitors with a mix of food trucks, games, craft projects, community organizations, a climbing wall and jumpy house. This year, the event expanded to feature local music acts, a community mural project and “Kirkie” awards for the most creative ways of traversing the CKC.

“This event highlights how very special Kirkland is to the people who live here and how fortunate we are to have this wonderful corridor that connects our community in so many ways,” Deputy Mayor Jay Arnold, who represents Kirkland on the Eastside Rail Corridor Regional Advisory Council, stated in a city press release.

Although not a part of the Crossing Kirkland event, the Kirkland Police Department Explorer Benefit Car Show was on the same day at the Kirkland Justice Center, just a couple blocks past one of the stations of Crossing Kirkland.

Crossing Kirkland is powered by volunteers, in-kind donations from local businesses and financial support from Google, City of Kirkland, 4Culture and McLeod Autobody. The event was one of the recipients of a City of Kirkland Community Sparks grant, which supports activities that build community or enhance Kirkland as a safe, inclusive and welcoming place for all.

For more information on the Crossing Kirkland event or the Cross Kirkland Corridor, contact Senior Neighborhood Outreach Coordinator Kari Page at kpage@kirklandwa.gov or (425) 587-3875, or email crossingkirkland@gmail.com.

A young girl gets a boost while riding her bike along the Cross Kirkland Corridor. Katie Metzger/staff photo

A young girl gets a boost while riding her bike along the Cross Kirkland Corridor. Katie Metzger/staff photo

Kids participate in a mural project led by artist Jean Bradbury to paint a railway signal cabinet. Katie Metzger/staff photo

Kids participate in a mural project led by artist Jean Bradbury to paint a railway signal cabinet. Katie Metzger/staff photo

Families walk and bike along the Cross Kirkland Corridor during Crossing Kirkland on Sept. 8. Katie Metzger

Families walk and bike along the Cross Kirkland Corridor during Crossing Kirkland on Sept. 8. Katie Metzger

A performance by Hula Halau O Makanaokalani entertains the audience at Crossing Kirkland. Katie Metzger/staff photo

A performance by Hula Halau O Makanaokalani entertains the audience at Crossing Kirkland. Katie Metzger/staff photo

LimeBikes were available at stations one and six during Crossing Kirkland. Katie Metzger/staff photo

LimeBikes were available at stations one and six during Crossing Kirkland. Katie Metzger/staff photo

A Crossing Kirkland participant shows her creativity with a Kalakala costume. Photo courtesy of the city of Kirkland, via Twitter

A Crossing Kirkland participant shows her creativity with a Kalakala costume. Photo courtesy of the city of Kirkland, via Twitter

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