AT&T employees, from left, Kristin Burrows and Roger Jochim donate their time at Hopelink in Kirkland. Contributed photo

AT&T employees give back at Hopelink in Kirkland

  • Monday, April 17, 2017 8:23am
  • News

AT&T employees volunteered at the Kirkland branch of Hopelink on Friday, working to stock the warehouse with food that will serve those in need across all of Hopelink’s five locations.

The volunteers helped to fill bags of rice and beans that will be offered at the food bank and also assembled emergency bags, which are delivered to locations around the area in an effort to get needed supplies to those who aren’t able to get to a Hopelink branch.

“This is a great opportunity for our work family to come together and give something back,” Farrah Morgan said. “It’s a big part of our company so this matches our home community with our work community.”

Hopelink serves homeless and low-income people in north and east King County through service centers in Redmond, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline and Sno-Valley. Assistance services focus on nine categories: Adult Education, Emergency Financial Help, Employment Services, Energy Assistance, Family Development, Financial Literacy, Food Assistance, Housing and Transportation.

“What I love about Hopelink is that they really preserve people’s dignity,” Suzanne Maxon said. “With the emergency bags for people who might need to carry stuff home, they’re in a regular shopping bag. There’s nothing calling attention to the fact they need help with their meals. And that’s very heartwarming to think that they really think about those things.”

Hopelink serves about 64,000 people annually.

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