Stray kitten surprises local priest during virtual Sunday service

“It was one of the most difficult sermons I’ve ever had to offer, because I was trying not to step on her.”

Screenshot of the stray kitten and the Rev. Aaron Burt from the July 12 liturgy video.

Screenshot of the stray kitten and the Rev. Aaron Burt from the July 12 liturgy video.

Attendees of Advent Anglican church in Kirkland got a fun surprise while watching the virtual liturgy Sunday, July 12, when an abandoned kitten joined the Rev. Aaron Burt during his sermon.

At about 22 minutes into the live liturgy, Burt shows the camera that a new friend has found him, a stray black kitten. As he continues to read, the kitten demands his attention. Burt said even when the kitten was off camera, it stayed nearby, weaving between his feet as he walked through the field near his home in Duvall.

“It was one of the most difficult sermons I’ve ever had to offer, because I was trying not to step on her,” Burt said.

Burt guesses someone abandoned the kitten at a nearby vegetable stand that gets a decent amount of visitors. When he saw the kitten, it started meowing and approaching him. He said she became instantly attached and was excited to see a person. He decided to film with her during his gospel reading, and that she stayed by his side even as he walked away.

While the church got a cute guest Sunday, the kitten also got a new home. Burt said a farmer who lived nearby was driving through, as the pastor was filming and holding the cat, and stopped to talk to him. He drove back later and decided to take the kitten home for his family, and to keep her safe from the dangers of being outdoors alone.

“I’m sure his kids will be thrilled because, as you can see in the video, it’s hard to find a more affectionate cat,” Burt said.

Burt said he’s been recording Sunday service out in nature since the church had to make the move online during the COVID-19 pandemic. It’s been tricky, Burt said, to find a public place that also is private enough to film. That road is one of many places he uses.

Many churches have recorded their sermons where it would normally take place, in the church. But Burt said filming in nature has reminded the audience that they are are all in this together, and that viewers aren’t the only ones missing out on attending church. The backdrop has also tied in well with many of the messages.

“To revisit places I filmed sermons a month prior, and see (seasonal) change in the fields and think about the way God has built into creation the message of death and resurrection,” Burt said. “To be able to do that, to be in a valley while I am literally talking about (the valley of death) is useful, powerful, but also beautiful.”

More information on Advent Anglican is available at advent.church.


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