From left: Flower Pot program chair Anne Hess, KDA executive director Michael Friedline, and Flower Pot program chair Kathy Feek pose near flower pots in downtown Kirkland with a sample of the new plaques. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo.

From left: Flower Pot program chair Anne Hess, KDA executive director Michael Friedline, and Flower Pot program chair Kathy Feek pose near flower pots in downtown Kirkland with a sample of the new plaques. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo.

Looking to adopt a flower pot?

Kirkland Downtown Association continues to keep downtown beautiful and vibrant.

Kirkland is a unique city. The atmosphere is vibrant and special, and people visit Kirkland for that reason. That is what Kirkland Downtown Association (KDA) executive director Michael Friedline believes.

“Part of what we’re trying to do is draw people,” Friedline said. “Not only [for] our residents but also [for the] people from out of town who come down here because it’s a great way to spend an afternoon.”

As a way to keep Kirkland looking vibrant, the KDA is once again looking for 40 individuals, families, or businesses to adopt a flowerpot each in downtown Kirkland through its flowerpot sponsorship program. The downtown flowerpots have been in Kirkland for more than 25 years.

“We think it’s important because it contributes to the ambiance, the quality of life, the feeling of Kirkland,” Friedline said about the flowerpots that are scattered around Kirkland.

KDA overtook the flowerpot program around 20 years ago when the city lacked funding for the program. The association continues to maintain the pots through the sponsorship program but is still seeking more funding. KDA is seeking locals to sponsor and dedicate a flowerpot for $250. This year, KDA is creating a plaque for each pot. Flower Pot adopters have the option to print their name, dedicate or memorialize someone, list their business, or leave an inspiring message. The goal is to adopt out all the pots by mid-May.

The flowerpots are replanted and maintained through all seasons, “bringing cheer and beauty” to the community. All the pots are self-watering and pots are maintained year round with different looks each season. The fowerpot program is chaired by long-time Kirkland residents and KDA board members, Kathy Feek and Anne Hess.

“It really makes a difference,” Hess said about the flowerpots. “It’s a great way to take part in the community and it makes a difference. It’s fun to be able to walk [downtown] and see the pots [with] the plaques.”

Feek explained that KDA would like to expand in the future by hanging flowerpots on Park Lane and down by the marina.

“Everything is ready to go but we don’t have additional [funds],” Feek said.

KDA’s tag line this year is, Celebrate Kirkland. And that is what it is trying to do with these flowerpots.

Aside from their flowerpot program, KDA presents community-wide events including the family 4th of July parade and fireworks, concerts in the park, the summer farmer’s market and more. The organization also beautifies downtown with periodic clean-ups and maintaining the flower pots. KDA serves as a communication link and liaison to the city and others on behalf of the downtown merchants.

To learn more about KDA visit www.kirklanddowntown.org.

To adopt a flowerpot, email Friedline at michael@kirklanddowntown.org.


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The Kirkland Downtown Association is once again looking for 40 individuals, families, or businesses that will adopt a flowerpot in downtown Kirkland through their Flower Pot sponsorship program. Each pot os $250 and includes a personalized plaque.

The Kirkland Downtown Association is once again looking for 40 individuals, families, or businesses that will adopt a flowerpot in downtown Kirkland through their Flower Pot sponsorship program. Each pot os $250 and includes a personalized plaque.

KDA is working towards completing all the adoptions by mid-May. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo.

KDA is working towards completing all the adoptions by mid-May. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo.

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