The Kirkland Fire Department has launched a pilot program to provide free automatic external defibrillators to local organizations. Photo courtesy of city of Kirkland

The Kirkland Fire Department has launched a pilot program to provide free automatic external defibrillators to local organizations. Photo courtesy of city of Kirkland

Kirkland Fire Department providing free AEDs through grant program

Businesses and nonprofits in Kirkland can apply for a grant.

  • Wednesday, May 22, 2019 8:30am
  • Life

The Kirkland Fire Department (KFD) has launched a pilot program to provide free lifesaving automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) to qualified organizations in Kirkland.

The AED grant program, which was originally initiated by the Kirkland City Council, is intended to place AEDs with organizations in the community that would have the greatest likelihood of providing members of the public with access to these lifesaving tools. Public access to AEDs bridges the gap from the time of collapse to the arrival of the KFD’s resources.

“We know that having an AED onsite when a person experiences a cardiac event drastically increases their chances for survival,” Kirkland Fire Chief Joe Sanford said in a press release.

Any business or nonprofit organization can apply to receive an AED through the pilot program. Applications and an AED agreement form are available on the city website at: http://bit.ly/KirklandAEDGrant.

For more information about the program or the application process, contact Joel Bodenman, EMS captain, at jbodeman@kirklandwa.gov.




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