The Kirkland Urban QFC location will be the second of the brand’s stores to include a Fit Market, where shoppers can find supplements and wellness products. Corey Oldenhuis/staff photo

The Kirkland Urban QFC location will be the second of the brand’s stores to include a Fit Market, where shoppers can find supplements and wellness products. Corey Oldenhuis/staff photo

QFC opens Kirkland Urban location, focuses on organic foods

Store includes larger Starbucks, new in-store pub and Tutta Bella.

It was all hands on deck the morning of July 29, as workers pushed to get the new QFC Kirkland flagship store — the sole grocery tenant in the expansive Kirkland Urban development — ready for the grand opening on July 31.

The roughly 50,000-square foot space employs 170 people and was a $23 million investment for the company. Though it won’t be brand’s largest Seattle-area store, it will be one of its leaders in organic food options, elevating QFC’s Simple Truth label more than ever while still providing conventional national brands.

The store’s opening is part of the first phase of a multi-phase construction plan at 425 Urban Plaza; the next step will include the demolition of the older QFC store nearby at 211 Parkplace Center.

Zach Stratton, corporate affairs manager for QFC, said the new store offers a variety of one-of-a-kind products that can’t be found at other locales.

“Everything was curated with this demographic in mind…We have years of data from [the Park Place] store, so now it’s about, ‘What does downtown Kirkland want? What do they buy?’ And starting fresh from there,” Stratton said.

He added, “It’s not an overwhelmingly big grocery section, it’s just a lot more local, natural and organic sections. You can see your national brands, you can still find your Cheetos, you’re just not going to have five feet of Cheetos.”

The butcher shop will feature grass-fed Angus beef, and in seafood, shoppers can try fish-based protein noodles to avoid carbs. Yummi Sushi, which won a bid among eight other sushi brands, will prepare fresh sushi daily and offer a special “Kirkland roll.”

Unique to the Kirkland location is the Q20 pub, replete with five high-definition TVs, eight rotating taps and a Frosé machine.

At the bar area, customers will be able to use iPads to order from in-store pizzeria Tutta Bella, another new QFC addition. The restaurant chain, founded in 2004 in Columbia City, is owned by a large Catholic family and in keeping with Tutta Bella tradition, a priest blessed the wood-fired oven in a family ceremony before the official opening.

Kirkland Urban will join other walkable communities like Ballard and Capitol Hill in having a DogSpot — a temperature-controlled, pay-by-the-hour dog house monitored via an app — so shoppers don’t have to bring their dogs inside.

Above the escalators leading up into the store from the parking garage hangs a specially commissioned mural by local artist Eleanor Doughty; the first 100 customers on Wednesday morning received a grocery bag with the Lake Washington-themed mural design on it.

The Kirkland Urban location will also be the second store to have a Fit Market section, stacked with a variety of whey protein, vitamins and other supplements, along with wellness items like bath bombs.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@kirklandreporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.kirklandreporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

The Kirkland Urban QFC officially opened July 31, and replaces the older store nearby at 211 Parkplace Center. Corey Oldenhuis/staff photo

The Kirkland Urban QFC officially opened July 31, and replaces the older store nearby at 211 Parkplace Center. Corey Oldenhuis/staff photo

More in Business

A new measure from the King County Council could increase flexibility for businesses in rural areas of King County. File photo
County measure would increase flexibility for businesses in rural areas

Staff report Legislation the King County Council passed June 23 could lead… Continue reading

Like similar businesses across King, Snohomish and Pierce counties, Bothell restaurant Hana Sushi closed due to public-health concerns. Sound Publishing file photo
Inslee changes course, says diners won’t have to sign in

Restaurants may still ask customers for information that contact tracers could use to stop an outbreak.

Businesses, nonprofits asked to participate in COVID-19 impact survey

Regional effort in King, Snohomish and Pierce counties

Construction worker installs siding to a building in Snoqualmie. File photo
Inslee gives construction a green light

It was unclear when sites would re-open, but employees will have to have PPE and stay six feet apart.

Report shows severity of COVID-19 impacts on hotels nationwide

70% of employees laid off or furloughed, eight in 10 hotel rooms empty

State processes record number of applications for unemployment benefits

Employment Security Department had challenges with the volume

Cantwell calls for nationwide support for local media hurt by COVID-19 pandemic

Remarks come on Senate floor: ‘We need the media. …and need to help them’

Gyms, fitness centers must allow members to cancel memberships or face legal consequences

State attorney general responds to consumer complaints during COVID-19 outbreak

Boeing to resume Washington airplane production next week

More than 27,000 employees are expected to return to work at the Everett campus starting Monday.

DigiPen serves up hot food and more for school community with DragonDrop

The new delivery service was started in response to the COVID-19 outbreak as a way to serve students and staff amid remote learning.