The remains of the cabin that burned Sunday morning, leaving a family of five dead. (Jesse Major/Peninsula Daily News)

The remains of the cabin that burned Sunday morning, leaving a family of five dead. (Jesse Major/Peninsula Daily News)

Five deaths in Brinnon cabin explosion, fire shock Peninsula

‘Tragic accident’ kills parents, three children

BRINNON — Officials are calling the explosion that left a family of five dead in Brinnon early Sunday morning a “tragic accident.”

Brinnon Fire Chief Tim Manly told reporters Monday afternoon the cause of the fire has not yet been determined and that the Federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives is still investigating the cause of the fire.

“Everybody is in shock right now,” Manly said. “Our thoughts and prayers are with the families of the victims of this.”

The identities of the parents and their three children have not been released, but Manly said they regularly vacationed at the 250-square-foot cabin on the 600 block of Salmon Street in Brinnon.

Some media outlets initially reported that the family was not allowed on the property. Manly said it was the family’s property, but he was aware of some confusion about the physical address of the property. The Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office also addressed the discrepancy.

He said neighbors reported at about 1 a.m. Sunday that they heard an explosion and that they saw flames shooting into the air.

When firefighters arrived they discovered the fully engulfed cabin and took a defensive posture.

During overhaul firefighters found the bodies of one adult and one child and immediately contacted the Washington State Crime Lab and ATF.

The bodies of two children and the other parent were found later in the day when investigators returned to the site, he said.

It was determined that the fire is not suspicious, but because of the seriousness of the incident Manly said he wanted to get state and federal officials involved.

“The suspicion is always in the back of our mind, but we need to make sure,” he said.

Manly said the news has hit the community hard and that he is thankful for the support the community has given to its first responders and the concern he has seen for the victims.

Fire departments that responded include the Brinnon Fire Department, Quilcene Fire Rescue, East Jefferson Fire-Rescue, Discovery Bay Fire Rescue, Port Ludlow Fire Rescue and a unit from Mason County.

________

This story was first published in the Bainbridge Island Review. Reporter Jesse Major can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 56250, or at jmajor@peninsuladailynews.com.

Brinnon Fire Chief Tim Manly speaks to reporters Monday about the fire that killed a family of five early Sunday morning. (Jesse Major/Peninsula Daily News)

Brinnon Fire Chief Tim Manly speaks to reporters Monday about the fire that killed a family of five early Sunday morning. (Jesse Major/Peninsula Daily News)

More in Northwest

Tasting room proposal could redefine alcohol production in King County

Pilot program would benefit wineries, breweries and distilleries. Several farmers are concerned.

Climbers rescued after days on Rainier

Several rescue attempts went awry, thanks to bad weather and flying conditions.

Rick Steves to give $1 million yearly to stop climate change

“If we are in the travel business, we are contributing to the destruction of our environment,” he said.

Gov. Jay Inslee shakes hands with Dinah Griffey after signing Senate Bill 5649 on April 19. The law revises the statute of limitations for sex crimes. Photo by Emma Epperly, WNPA Olympia News Bureau
Hits and misses from Legislature’s 2019 session

New laws target vaccines, sex crimes and daylight savings; losers include sex ed and dwarf tossing bills.

Gov. Jay Inslee speaks to protesting nurses on April 24 at the State Capitol Building in Olympia. Inslee indicated he would sign the bill for meal and rest breaks into law if it passes both chambers. Photo by Emma Epperly, WNPA Olympia News Bureau
Lawmakers approve ‘nursing bill’ for mandatory meal and rest breaks

Nurses show up in Olympia to support bill, protest Sen. Walsh’s remarks.

Colton Harris-Moore, known as the “Barefoot Bandit,” as seen on a GoFundMe page where he sought to raise $125,000 for flight training. (GoFundMe)
‘Barefoot Bandit’ asks judge to shorten his supervised release

Colton Harris-Moore says travel restrictions are holding back a lucrative public-speaking career.

USPS district manager Darrell Stoke, Janie Hendrix and Congressman Adam Smith (D-WA) unveil the plaque honorarily naming the Renton Highlands Post Office as the “James Marshall ‘Jimi’ Hendrix Post Office” on Friday, April 19. Photo by Haley Ausbun
Highlands Post Office honors Jimi Hendrix

Postal Service connected Hendrix to family during his Army service.

Walkers rest amid the trees at Island Center Forest on Vashon Island, which is part of King County. Many trees around Western Washington are struggling, including Western hemlock on Vashon, likely from drought stress. Photo by Susie Fitzhugh
King County forests are facing new challenges

Hot, dry summers are stressing native tree species in Western Washington.

Washington State Capitol Building. Photo by Emma Epperly/WNPA Olympia News Bureau
Legislation targets rape kit backlog

WA has about 10,000 untested kits; new law would reduce testing time to 45 days

Federal Way resident competes for top 20 spot on ‘American Idol’

Todd Beamer senior Myra Tran previously won “The X-Factor Vietnam” in 2016.

Photo by Kayse Angel
What’s next for the I-405 master plan?

New express toll lanes from Renton to Bellevue are coming soon.

The 2015 Wolverine Fire in the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest near Lake Chelan. Photo courtesy of Washington Department of Natural Resources/Kari Greer
Western Washington faces elevated wildfire risk in 2019

Humans cause majority of fires in state