One of the things Kirkland’s Proposition 1 will pay for is police services. Courtesy photo

One of the things Kirkland’s Proposition 1 will pay for is police services. Courtesy photo

Voters decide on city’s Prop. 1 measure

The sales tax increase for police services and community safety was passing as of election night.

Kirkland’s Proposition 1, a sales and use tax increase for enhanced police services and community safety, needed a simple majority to pass. As of election night on Nov. 6, it was passing with about 57 percent of the vote.

Money from the voter-approved 0.1 percent sales tax increase would fund a police task force and resource officers, city mental health programs and annual funding for firearms training, gun storage and homeless shelters.

According to the ballot measure, planned funding includes: a police ProAct unit (four full-time officers and one support position) to focus on property and drug-related crimes; the city’s share of costs for four full-time school resource officers in Kirkland middle schools; one neighborhood resource officer (focusing on community policing and mental health emergency support); and the services of one full-time mental health professional.

Supporters say that “Proposition 1 provides much needed enhancements to public safety,” while opponents argued that “everything the city proposes can be done using tax money already available.”

The city estimates the increase will net $1.8 million annually, one-third of which must be dedicated to criminal justice or fire protection purposes under state law.

Washington votes by mail and ballots can be postmarked as late as Election Day, meaning results could change in the following days. Check back this week for updated results.

Results can also be found at www.kingcounty.gov/elections. The election will be certified on Nov. 27.

For additional election coverage, visit kirklandreporter.com.

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