Kirkland City Council member Penny Sweet. Reporter file photo

Sweet announces intent to run for re-election to the Kirkland City Council

  • Monday, February 13, 2017 12:45pm
  • News

Kirkland City Council member Penny Sweet has announced her intention to run for a third term this year.

Sweet was first elected to the Council in 2010 and served two two-year terms as deputy mayor.

She said that she is “proud of the strides Kirkland has made the past eight years.”

Sweet particularly points to the current redevelopment of the old Antique Mall, Kirkland Urban, The Village at Totem Lake, the creation of the Cross Kirkland Corridor, and the successful Finn Hill, Juanita and Kingsgate annexation in 2011. She also points to the “fiscally prudent financial policies resulting in a consistent AAA credit rating for the city”.

The councilwoman has lived in Kirkland and has operated a downtown business, The Grape Choice, for more than 30 years with her husband, and former Kirkland mayor, Rep. Larry Springer.

Sweet, a member of the Kirkland Chamber of Commerce and the Downtown Association, founded Celebrate Kirkland!, which has put on the Kirkland 4th of July events during the past 18 years and she has organized the Winterfest tree lighting ceremony since 2013.

She is a past recipient of the Bill Woods Award for community leadership and the Anne J. Owen Award for community service.

As a City Council member, Sweet chairs the Public Safety Committee and sits on the Planning and Economic Development Committee. Regionally, she serves on the boards of Cascade Water Alliance and the King County Economic Development Council. On behalf of the Sound Cities Association, she chairs the Emergency Management Advisory Committee Caucus and is a member of the Solid Waste Advisory Committee and the King County Regional Water Quality Committee.

Sweet plans a formal campaign kick-off in May.

She said she welcomes questions, concerns, and suggestions from Kirkland residents anytime.

Sweet’s campaign website is www.sweetforkirkland.com.

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