Sound Publishing nets 250 journalism awards at WNPA event

  • Friday, October 20, 2017 10:44am
  • News

Sound Publishing employees received more than 250 journalism awards at the 2017 Washington Newspaper Publishers Association annual meeting on Oct. 12-14 in Olympia.

Kirkland Reporter staff won five awards. Former staff writers Catherine Krummey, Allison DeAngelis, and editor Samantha Pak won second place in Best News Story (Long) for “Eastside Police Departments Examine Future of Proactive Policing.” Former reporter John William Howard placed third for his comprehensive coverage of heroin, and second in Best Sports Personality Profile for “‘Linewoman’ is breaking gender stereotypes.” Krummey’s story “Bellevue Man Admits to Decapitating Duck” won first place in News of the Weird. Former editor Matt Phelps placed third for Best Editorial — “Elected Officials Deserve Respect.”

The company’s Eastside newspapers — including the Bellevue, Issaquah-Sammamish, Kirkland, Mercer Island, Redmond Reporter newspapers, and the Snoqualmie Valley Record — won 26 awards across the news, photography and advertising categories.

For the Bellevue Reporter, former staff writer Ryan Murray won first place in the category Best Business Feature Story for his story “Bellevue Vacuum Closes its Doors.” He also won two third-place awards for his arts story “Strategies for Survival” and news story “South Asians Lead Resistance to Hate Crimes.”

Former Bellevue staff writer Allison DeAngelis won second place for her comprehensive coverage of “Agency Cuts all Head Start Funding.” She also won two third-place awards for her news stories “Homeowners Left High and Dry after Sewage Line Backup” and “Police Respond to 911 Calls, Discover 100-plus Pokemon Go Players.”

Current Bellevue reporter Raechel Dawson won three awards for the Federal Way Mirror, including a pair of first-place awards for her feature “Hike It Baby Helps Moms Recharge,” and news story “City Focused on Gaps in Homeless Services.” She also won third place in Best Crime Story for “Sixth Murder of 2016 Shakes Community.”

The Issaquah/Sammamish Reporter won six awards. Former staff writer Megan Campbell took first in Best General Feature Story (Long) for her story, “Seattle’s ‘Gateway to the Orient.’”

Nicole Jennings won second in Best General Feature Story (Long), for “Museum Solves 30-year Family History Mystery.”

Former staff writer Joe Livarchik won second in Best Crime and Court Story for “Residents Speak Out after Claim of Racially-motivated Incident.” He also placed third for Best Health story — “Understanding Suicidal Youth.”

Sports writer Shaun Scott won first place for Best Sports News story for his story, “Spartans Capture King County Soccer Title.”

Diana Nelson won third place for Best Single Ad for Single Advertiser for Sammamish Days & Nights.

The Mercer Island Reporter’s Katie Metzger received first place in the Best General Feature Story (short) category for her story “Two Mercer Islanders celebrate 100th birthdays.”

For the Redmond Reporter, Samantha Pak won a pair of first-place editorial awards: Best Health or Medical Story — “Cardiac arrest survivor pays it back on soccer field” and Best Crime or Court Story — “Local law enforcement respond to Dallas shooting.”

Andy Nystrom took first place in photography in Color Pictorial — “My City Redmond” and third place in Color Feature Photo — “Joyous Festival of Color.” On the editorial side, he took second place in Best Health or Medical Story — “One tough, inspirational Mustang.”

In advertising, Diana Nelson and Sonny Ebalo took second place for “Summer Fun Guide” in Use of Color (half page or larger).

For the Snoqualmie Valley Record, Carol Ladwig placed second in News of the Weird — “Looking for Bigfoot.”

Wendy Fried placed second for Best Single Ad (smaller than half page) for the Valley Center Stage’s “Night Must Fall.”

For a complete list of winners, visit

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