Kirkland City Hall. Reporter file photo

Kirkland City Hall. Reporter file photo

Residents can report potholes, street lights and more on Our Kirkland app

It’s now easier for Kirkland residents to report and resolve issues.

  • Tuesday, March 26, 2019 8:30am
  • News

On March 11, the city launched Our Kirkland, a new app and online service that allows community members to report issues and track their resolution on their smartphone, tablet or home computer.

Our Kirkland is a user-friendly online customer service portal that gives residents a streamlined opportunity to report non-emergency issues such as potholes or graffiti, request services and contact the Kirkland City Council. The new service request portal is accessible through the city website via any desktop computer and is available as a free mobile app that can be downloaded from the Apple App Store or Google Play.

“The city is excited to offer this new tool to our community members,” Kirkland city manager Kurt Triplett said in a city press release. “The City Council funded Our Kirkland as part of their ongoing commitment to customer service and responsiveness. The Our Kirkland app is designed to make it easier for community members to report concerns and view responses from city staff.”

According to the release, users can set up an Our Kirkland account to view their service request history, including status, progress and details of how the issue was resolved, at any time. Requests and issue reports may also be submitted anonymously, based on user preference.

The tool allows users to easily add images and other supporting documents, for additional detail when reporting things like potholes in roadways or issues within the city’s parks system. When an item requiring city attention is identified, a resident can simply pull out their smart phone, photograph the issue, use the app’s mapping tool to pinpoint the location and submit the request — all within a matter of minutes — according to the release.

Our Kirkland is for non-emergency issues only. Residents who need immediate emergency assistance should call 9-1-1.

More in News

Protections for nurses’ working conditions supported by Eastside legislators

Improvements to working conditions for nurses are closer than ever thanks to House Bill 1155.

Jim Pitts stands on walkway overlooking filtration chambers at the King County South Filtration Plant in Renton. Aaron Kunkler/staff photo
Human waste: Unlikely climate change hero?

King County treatment plant joins effort to counteract effects of carbon dioxide.

Kailan Manandic/staff photo
                                Officials break ground outside Salt House Church for the Eastside’s first permanent women and family shelter. Workers hope to complete construction in 2020.
Eastside’s first permanent shelter breaks ground in Kirkland

The shelter will serve single women and families with children who are experiencing homelessness.

Kirkland council to discuss restricting discharge of firearms

The ordinance, set for a vote on May 7, is similar to ones already adopted in nearby cities.

The Sound Transit double-decker buses replace the articulated buses on Everett to Bellevue routes along I-405. The 14.5-foot tall buses seat more people for an equal footprint and similar fuel economy. Kailan Manandic/staff photo
Double-deckers descend on the Eastside

The new 14.5-foot tall buses will run from Everett to Bellevue, with stops in Bothell and Kirkland.

LWSD Resource Center. Photo by Jason Rothkowitz 2010
LWSD Capital Projects levy addresses overcrowding and security in schools

The upcoming levy, if passed, will build more classrooms and install security cameras.

Most Read