Courtesy of the City of Kirkland

Courtesy of the City of Kirkland

No injuries in two Kirkland house fires Wednesday night

Crews from the Kirkland Fire Department and surrounding agencies responded to two house fires Wednesday night.

There were no injuries to civilians or firefighters in either fire.

At 7:32 p.m., Kirkland firefighters were dispatched to reports of smoke and flames from a single-family home in the 14100 block of 123rd Ave. N.E. in Kirkland.

According to a city press release, firefighters arrived within five minutes to find flames from the second floor of the home. All occupants had safely evacuated by the time firefighters arrived and the fire was quickly knocked down.

KFD units were assisted by crews from Woodinville, Bothell and Redmond.

Less than 40 minutes after the first fire Wednesday, firefighters were dispatched to a second house fire in the 150 block of 117th Pl. N.E. in Kirkland — about one mile from the first fire.

Crews from the Bothell Fire Department were first to arrive and were soon joined by crews from Kirkland, Woodinville, Bellevue and Redmond — some of whom had just finished at the first fire, the release states.

“We have a great working relationship with our partners,” KFD Deputy Chief Dave Van Valkenburg said about their counterparts at other cities.

He said the training across the different departments is similar, with similar expectations. This allows them to be familiar with each other’s equipment and procedures so they can provide seamless and safe service to the various communities they serve. In addition, Van Valkenburg said the various departments also purchase similar equipment or purchase equipment together.

The large flames at the second incident forced crews out of the building before a large volume of water was used from the exterior, according to the release. Firefighters eventually reentered the structure to extinguish remaining hot spots.

Crews remained on-scene overnight Wednesday to monitor hot spots.

A second city release states that a unique set of circumstances are linked to the cause of both fires.

At about 5 p.m. both homes, which were about a mile apart, experienced a power outage. Residents in both homes were preparing food on the stove top. When the power went out, the release states that the occupants left their homes without properly turning off the stove tops. Home owners in both cases returned to find their homes engulfed in fire.

“The Kirkland Fire Department would like to remind all residents to always check their stove tops when they experience a power outage,” the release states.

Van Valkenburg said when the power came back on, the stove top burners became re-energized, became hot and ignited combustibles. This was the origin for both fires.

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