Nixon seeks re-election to Kirkland council

Council seats currently held by Dave Asher and Tom Neir will also be up for election this year.

  • Friday, January 4, 2019 8:30am
  • News
Toby Nixon. Photo courtesy of Toby Nixon

Toby Nixon. Photo courtesy of Toby Nixon

Two-term Kirkland councilmember Toby Nixon has announced that he is seeking election to a third term.

“I love the work, especially the opportunities to help people, to learn new things and to be a voice for individual liberty, personal responsibility, limited government, free enterprise, equality before the law, transparency and accountability, and public engagement,” Nixon said in a press release. “I hope the people of Kirkland will give me the privilege and blessing of doing this for another four years.”

According to the release, council seats currently held by Dave Asher and Tom Neir will also be up for election in 2019. An election will also be held to fill the remaining two years of the unexpired term of Mayor Amy Walen, who recently announced her resignation from council to serve in the state legislature. The primary election is Aug. 6 and the general election is Nov. 5.

Nixon serves on the council public safety committee as well as the public works, parks, and human services committee. In addition, he chairs the city’s tourism development committee and currently serves on the King County Charter Review Commission, which will propose amendments to the county charter to the county council in 2019.

Prior to serving on city council, Nixon served as 45th Legislative District state representative and as a commissioner of King County Fire District 41. He co-chaired the campaign supporting annexation of Kingsgate, North Juanita and Finn Hill into Kirkland.

According to the release, Nixon is one of the organizers of Kirkland Nourishing Network, which mobilizes community members to provide boxes of food to help needy families through long school breaks when their children don’t receive breakfast and lunch at school. He previously served on the board of directors of Youth Eastside Services and other charitable and environmental nonprofits.

Nixon is president of Washington Coalition for Open Government, a statewide nonprofit that advocates for open access to public records and meetings. According to the release, he has been recognized nationally for his work on government transparency, including induction into the “State Open Government Hall of Fame” by the National Freedom of Information Coalition and the Society of Professional Journalists.

A 25-year Microsoft veteran with more than 40 years of computer industry experience, Nixon serves on the boards of directors of several worldwide industry organizations including the USB Implementers Forum and as chair of the board of directors of Kirkland-based Bluetooth Special Interest Group, the release states.

Nixon and his wife Irene have five grown children and live in the Kingsgate neighborhood.

For more information on Nixon, see www.tobynixon.com.

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