Nixon led Washington Coalition for Open Government gives Gov. Inslee Key Award

Washington Governor Jay Inslee received the Washington Coalition for Open Government’s Key Award Jan. 28 for declaring that he will not exercise a sweeping “executive privilege” newly created by a state Supreme Court ruling.

  • Wednesday, January 29, 2014 7:21pm
  • News

Washington Governor Jay Inslee received the Washington Coalition for Open Government’s Key Award Jan. 28 for declaring that he will not exercise a sweeping “executive privilege” newly created by a state Supreme Court ruling.

The award, given to individuals or groups who do something notable for the cause of open government, was presented to Inslee in his office by WCOG board member Bill Will, executive director of the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association.

“Governor Inslee’s principled stand in favor of transparency should receive positive recognition because it has singlehandedly prevented bad law from taking effect,” said WCOG President and Kirkland City Council member Toby Nixon. “It will also encourage future governors to adhere to the same voluntary standard of openness.  He has made lemonade out of lemons.”

In October, the Washington State Supreme Court, ruling in a suit filed by the Freedom Foundation, held that Washington’s governor is constitutionally entitled to an executive privilege that allows him or her to shield virtually all of his communications from disclosure under the state’s Public Records Act.

Even before the case was decided, Inslee vowed as a gubernatorial candidate not to exercise the privilege claimed by then-Governor Chris Gregoire, the defendant in the Freedom Foundation’s lawsuit. Since taking office, Inslee has reaffirmed that stance through his spokesmen.

The court’s decision has prompted several legislators to propose a constitutional amendment barring the governor from making a broad claim of executive privilege.

More in News

Suspect arrested for Kirkland Key Bank robbery needed money for rent

Media outlets led police to man’s identification.

King County Correctional Facility is located at 500 5th Ave., Seattle. File photo
King County jail’s leaky pipes have national implications

Lawsuit filed in King County Superior Court alleges Aquatherm has been selling faulty pipes.

Siri Bliesner, Susan Wilkins and John Towers compete for Lake Washington School District Director District 5 position. Courtesy photos
Three candidates aim to fill an open seat on the Lake Washington School Board

Siri Bliesner, John Towers and Susan Wilkins compete for Lake Washington School District Director District 5 position.

Kirkland resident Elizabeth Standal holds broken heart at the Lights for Liberty Vigil on July 12. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo
Lights for Liberty Vigil in Kirkland protests conditions of migrant camps

The Kol Ami congregation gathered July 12 for the Lights for Liberty Vigil, calling for an end “human concentration camps.”

VoteWA is a $9.5 million program that came online last May and is meant to unify all 39 county voting systems in the state into a single entity. Courtesy image
WA’s new voting system concerns county elections officials

VoteWA has run into some problems in recent months as the Aug. 6 primary election draws closer.

PSE’s battery storage project could help the clean energy roll-out

The tiny pilot project in Glacier could eventually be expanded.

Kirkland officer fatally shoots man threatening 18-month-old child

King County Sheriff’s Office will conduct investigation into shooting.

An aerial photo shows the locations of two earthquakes and five aftershocks in and near Monroe, which rattled the Puget Sound region early Friday. The first was the magnitude 4.6 quake at upper right, 13 miles under the intersection of U.S. 2 and Fryelands Boulevard SE at 2:51 a.m. The second, magnitude 3.5, occurred 18 miles under the Old Snohomish-Monroe Road at 2:53 a.m. The aftershocks followed during the ensuing two hours. This image depicts an area about 3 miles wide. (Herald staff and the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network)
Early wake-up call: Twin quakes under Monroe rattle region

Thousands of people felt them. They were magnitude 4.6 and 3.5 and hit minutes apart.

Most Read