Madison Miller/staff photo
                                Dianne and Dick Haelsig were honored as donors at the LWTech’s Bright Futures Benefit Breakfast on Oct. 29.

Madison Miller/staff photo Dianne and Dick Haelsig were honored as donors at the LWTech’s Bright Futures Benefit Breakfast on Oct. 29.

LWTech raises more than $250,000 at annual benefit breakfast

The fundraising event supports students with scholarships, program support and emergency funds.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology (LWTech), through the LWTech Foundation, hosted its annual Bright Futures Benefit Breakfast on Oct. 29.

The fundraising event supports students with scholarships, program support and emergency funds. This year, the event raised an all-time high of $256,000 to fund about 200 scholarships.

Last year, the event raised about $200,000 last year, serving 75 students through the Bridge the Gap Student Emergency Fund.

LWTech President Dr. Amy Morrison said the college has turned a financial corner.

“We’ve turned from surviving to thriving,” she said. “We’re able to continue to support dedicated students to reach their academic goals.”

The event allowed students who benefited from scholarships, program support and emergency funds to share how it affected their education opportunities at LWTech.

Amy Mason, a graduate from LWTech Center of Architecture, Design and Engineering, said the program support allowed her and her team to participate in a national architecture competition awards ceremony in Las Vegas. She and her teammates were unable to afford to travel for the competition and the program support fund helped pay for their travel expenses.

The event also honored two of LWTech Foundation’s board of directors and donors, Dick and Dianne Haelsig.

“We’re proud members that have helped the foundation grow,” Dianne Haelsig said. “We look forward to the foundation to continue to grow and support these great students.”

The benefit breakfast concluded with a call to action. For more information about LWTech Foundation, or what degrees LWTech can offer, visit www.lwtech.edu.

LWTech president, Dr. Amy Morrison spoke at the Bright Futures Benefit Breakfast on Oct. 29. Madison Miller/staff photo

LWTech president, Dr. Amy Morrison spoke at the Bright Futures Benefit Breakfast on Oct. 29. Madison Miller/staff photo

Madison Miller/staff photo
                                Amy Mason was one of the recipients of LWTech’s scholarships for program support.

Madison Miller/staff photo Amy Mason was one of the recipients of LWTech’s scholarships for program support.

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