Members of the Kirkland City Council, the Park Board and the Juanita Neighborhood Association cut the ribbon at Edith Moulton Park on July 21. Photo courtesy of the city of Kirkland

Members of the Kirkland City Council, the Park Board and the Juanita Neighborhood Association cut the ribbon at Edith Moulton Park on July 21. Photo courtesy of the city of Kirkland

Kirkland reopens Edith Moulton Park to public after renovation

Boardwalks, off-leash dog trails, a picnic pavilion, a play structure and a restroom were added.

After six months of construction, Edith Moulton Park officially opened to the public on July 21.

A ribbon cutting ceremony held that morning featured special guests and speakers from Kirkland City Council, the park board and the Juanita Neighborhood Association.

The park was annexed by the city in 2011. In 2015, council adopted a master plan for the park and approved $1 million for its design and renovation, including gravel paths, boardwalks, a picnic pavilion, a play structure and a restroom building. The renovation, funded by the voter-approved 2012 parks levy, began in January.

The renovations include ADA-compliant parking spots, a new bicycle lane and a sidewalk replacement along the park’s western border with 108th Avenue Northeast that will add access for those who are visually impaired or are traveling by wheelchair. The project also included a series of fenced, off-leash dog trails.

The renovation is based on Edith Moulton’s dream to dedicate her family’s homestead as “a place for children to play in nature.” The park is a 26-acre remnant farm parcel that was initially developed by King County. Moulton, who grew up on the property and experienced farm life there, donated it to the county in the 1960s.

Edith Moulton Park is located at 13634 108th Ave NE, south of Helen Keller Elementary School.

See www.kirklandwa.gov for more.

Park goers enjoy the new boardwalks at Edith Moulton Park, which reopened to the public after a renovation last weekend. Photo courtesy of the city of Kirkland

Park goers enjoy the new boardwalks at Edith Moulton Park, which reopened to the public after a renovation last weekend. Photo courtesy of the city of Kirkland

The Edith Moulton Park renovation project featured a new picnic pavilion, along with a new restroom and play structure. Photo courtesy of the city of Kirkland

The Edith Moulton Park renovation project featured a new picnic pavilion, along with a new restroom and play structure. Photo courtesy of the city of Kirkland

Pets and their owners will enjoy the new off-leash dog trails at Edith Moulton Park. Photo courtesy of the city of Kirkland

Pets and their owners will enjoy the new off-leash dog trails at Edith Moulton Park. Photo courtesy of the city of Kirkland

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