A patch of mud in the middle of 132nd Square Park’s soccer field dries in the unseasonably warm weather of March 20. The city of Kirkland is planning to install a stormwater system beneath this field that will consolidate and treat stormwater run-off from the surrounding 48.5 acres. The project will require a 10-foot-deep hole that is nearly the size of the soccer field. Kirkland’s leaders are seizing on this money-saving opportunity — as well as the need to expand park access — to replace the grass surface with synthetic turf. Photo courtesy of the city of Kirkland

A patch of mud in the middle of 132nd Square Park’s soccer field dries in the unseasonably warm weather of March 20. The city of Kirkland is planning to install a stormwater system beneath this field that will consolidate and treat stormwater run-off from the surrounding 48.5 acres. The project will require a 10-foot-deep hole that is nearly the size of the soccer field. Kirkland’s leaders are seizing on this money-saving opportunity — as well as the need to expand park access — to replace the grass surface with synthetic turf. Photo courtesy of the city of Kirkland

Kirkland plans for major infrastructure investments at 132nd Square Park

Residents are being asked to give their input.

  • Friday, April 12, 2019 8:30am
  • News

The city of Kirkland is in the design phase for a project that will look to improve stormwater management and add amenities in 132nd Square Park.

Before construction is expected in summer 2020, the city is doing a community outreach effort that has so far involved a neighborhood meeting, an open house and an online survey.

The need to enhance stormwater infrastructure in the the Totem Lake and Juanita Basin drainage systems was the “catalyst” for the project, said Kellie Stickney, communications program manager for the city. Heavy rains and snowmelt can overwhelm the drainage systems, flooding streets, sidewalks and homes in the area.

The plan was to put a water filtration system underneath one of the ballfields at the nearby park, which involves “opening up the ground in a pretty major way,” said Lynn Zwaagstra, Kirkland’s parks and community services director.

The city saw an opportunity to consider other amenities that could be installed over the completed stormwater project, like synthetic turf and overhead lights. It also decided to initiate a master plan process to fully consider the usefulness of the park to both neighbors and the broader community.

“There’s a lot of people who use the park, and love the park,” Zwaagstra said, and the city wants to understand what people like about the amenities and how they can be improved.

132nd Square Park is one of Kirkland’s seven community parks. It is about 10 acres and has two ballfields, a playground, a parking lot, restrooms, a small picnic shelter, some pathways and, according to neighbors, a “fantastic sledding hill.”

“Any time we’re going to develop a park, we do a master plan and that helps for a lot of reasons,” Zwaagstra said. “It gives us design concepts that we can then seek funding for. You can’t apply for grants if you don’t know what you’re building and approximately at what cost.”

The stormwater part of the project is partly funded by a Department of Ecology grant and King County flood control fund, said Aparna Khanal, senior project engineer. The city may also pursue funding from the youth athletic field grant program, as the ballfield is expected to cost between $3 million and $5 million.

Zwaagstra said that Kirkland’s most recent Parks, Recreation and Open Space (PROS) plan, last updated in 2015, identified the need for additional ballfields and a desire to convert some fields to synthetic turf.

“In this wet climate, [turf] increases playability of the field and it also gives you a greatly expanded season,” Zwaagstra said. “We already had a project identified to rehab this specific field…That project was put on hold knowing that field would be dug up in a year or two.”

The stormwater project presented the “perfect opportunity” to reinstate project and consider synthetic turf, she said.

The project is in an early phase of design right now and construction should take six to nine months. The city expects to go out for bids this spring or summer.

In mid-March, a consultant hired by the city tested soil in the park to understand how water moves through it. When construction starts in spring of 2020, crews will be doing extensive digging in the park to create a large underground vault for managing stormwater flows.

Interested parties can comment online, or at any Kirkland City Council or Park Board meeting, Stickney said.

See 132ndsquarepark.participate.online for more.

More in News

Protections for nurses’ working conditions supported by Eastside legislators

Improvements to working conditions for nurses are closer than ever thanks to House Bill 1155.

Jim Pitts stands on walkway overlooking filtration chambers at the King County South Filtration Plant in Renton. Aaron Kunkler/staff photo
Human waste: Unlikely climate change hero?

King County treatment plant joins effort to counteract effects of carbon dioxide.

Kailan Manandic/staff photo
                                Officials break ground outside Salt House Church for the Eastside’s first permanent women and family shelter. Workers hope to complete construction in 2020.
Eastside’s first permanent shelter breaks ground in Kirkland

The shelter will serve single women and families with children who are experiencing homelessness.

Kirkland plans for major infrastructure investments at 132nd Square Park

Residents are being asked to give their input.

Kirkland council to discuss restricting discharge of firearms

The ordinance, set for a vote on May 7, is similar to ones already adopted in nearby cities.

The Sound Transit double-decker buses replace the articulated buses on Everett to Bellevue routes along I-405. The 14.5-foot tall buses seat more people for an equal footprint and similar fuel economy. Kailan Manandic/staff photo
Double-deckers descend on the Eastside

The new 14.5-foot tall buses will run from Everett to Bellevue, with stops in Bothell and Kirkland.

LWSD Resource Center. Photo by Jason Rothkowitz 2010
LWSD Capital Projects levy addresses overcrowding and security in schools

The upcoming levy, if passed, will build more classrooms and install security cameras.

Most Read