A sign in 132nd Square Park updates residents on the potential improvements taking place within the park. Madeline Coats/staff photo

A sign in 132nd Square Park updates residents on the potential improvements taking place within the park. Madeline Coats/staff photo

Kirkland park board reviews concepts for 132nd Square Park

The city aims to better manage stormwater in Totem Lake/Juanita Creek basin.

The city of Kirkland has presented three design concepts to better manage stormwater in the Totem Lake/Juanita Creek basin.

The stormwater retrofit is necessary due to heavy rains and snowmelt that overwhelm the current drainage systems, resulting in flooded streets, homes and sidewalks. This project aims to reduce the amount of stormwater that flows into Totem Lake, as well as filter out many pollutants.

On July 10, the Park Board reviewed potential designs at 132nd Square Park. Staff will now take all the feedback and develop a more refined concept to be presented in September. A final design will likely be given to City Council in October.

“The concept that will be presented to the Park Board in September will likely include elements from all three options that are currently being presented,” said park planning and development manager Mary Gardocki in a press release on July 3.

Kirkland is planning to invest in the park’s ball fields, trail system and playgrounds, according to construction updates on the city’s website. City leaders are engaging the community in the master plan process.

“These concepts were initially presented at a public meeting held on June 20 attended by 55 community members,” said Kellie Stickney, city communications program manager, in the release.

All three design concepts include a synthetic turf field with lighting, but each features various park elements that are reliant on public feedback. By installing turf, the city will save nearly $2 million in construction costs.

132nd Square Park is one of Kirkland’s seven community parks, which results in large masses of residents desiring to play sports. A turf surface will enable people to play on the field year-round, even in the wettest conditions.

Stickney explained that the three ideas were developed based on input collected from public meetings, open houses, events in the park and online survey responses.

Survey results indicated that 77.08 percent of residents currently use the park for walking, whereas 52.08 percent use it for the playground. In addition, 51.11 percent of survey takers said they prefer tree care and maintenance to be included as part of the park.

Wandering Woodlands

The first design plan includes the addition of disc golf, picnic shelters with a play area, the remodel of a restroom, an informal sled hill and no parking expansion.

Play Forest

The second concept features a new restroom, a storage building, a more structured sled hill and 20 additional parking stalls.

Boulevard Stroll

The third option contains 60 additional parking spaces, a new restroom, picnic shelters and a large storage building. This course of action would be the most expensive.

“The three options presented are intended to reflect the values and priorities we heard from neighbors and community members, including the desire to retain natural areas, open play areas, and the community sled hill,” said Gardocki.

Kirkland’s contractor aims to begin construction on the stormwater retrofit project in the spring of 2020 once a design concept is chosen.

Option 1 — Wandering Woodlands — is the least costly design concept for 132nd Square Park. Rendering courtesy of city of Kirkland

Option 1 — Wandering Woodlands — is the least costly design concept for 132nd Square Park. Rendering courtesy of city of Kirkland

Option 2 — Play Forest — features new buildings and a more parking spaces, among other things. Rendering courtesy of city of Kirkland

Option 2 — Play Forest — features new buildings and a more parking spaces, among other things. Rendering courtesy of city of Kirkland

Option 3 — Boulevard Stroll — offers 60 additional parking spaces, although this course of action would be the most expensive. Rendering courtesy of city of Kirkland

Option 3 — Boulevard Stroll — offers 60 additional parking spaces, although this course of action would be the most expensive. Rendering courtesy of city of Kirkland

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