Kirkland councilmembers earn Certificates of Municipal Leadership

The following is a release from the city of Kirkland:

  • Tuesday, August 16, 2016 11:38am
  • News

Kirkland City Hall - Reporter file photo

The following is a release from the city of Kirkland:

Three Kirkland councilmembers recently earned Certificates of Municipal Leadership for their completion of a training program provided by the Association of Washington Cities (AWC). The program is designed to enhance the ability of elected municipal officials to more efficiently serve the communities they represent. To earn this distinction, Councilmembers Toby Nixon and Penny Sweet participated in over 60 hours of training through a variety of AWC sponsored municipal workshops, earning advanced credentials. Deputy Mayor Jay Arnold completed more than 30 hours of training.

The Municipal Leadership program provides elected officials with the knowledge and skills needed to effectively operate within the law, plan for the future, secure and manage funds, and foster community and staff relationships.

“The elected officials who earn this certificate demonstrate a commitment to continuous learning and a desire to bring new ideas back to their community,” said Peter B. King, chief executive officer of the Association of Washington Cities.

All three councilmembers have demonstrated valuable service to their community throughout the years.

Sweet moved to Kirkland in 1985 where she and her husband, Washington state Rep. Larry Springer own and operate The Grape Choice, a retail wine shop located in downtown Kirkland. She began her first term on the Kirkland City Council in January 2010. She served as deputy mayor from 2010-2011 and again from 2014-2015.

Nixon has served on the Council since January 2012. In December 2013, Nixon earned his Certificate of Municipal Leadership for completing the first 30 hours of training. He has since completed an additional 30 hours, earning an advanced distinction.

Arnold began his first term on the Kirkland City Council in January 2014 and was chosen by councilmembers to serve as deputy major in January 2016 for a two-year term.

To contact members of the Kirkland City Council, visit Kirkland’s Meet the Council webpage or contact Amy Bolen at (425) 587-3007 to schedule an appointment.

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