King County Flood Control District approves 2019 Budget on Nov. 5. Photo courtesy of King County Flood Control District.

King County Flood Control District approves 2019 Budget on Nov. 5. Photo courtesy of King County Flood Control District.

King County Flood Control District approves $93 million budget

The 2019 District Budget will maintain current flood protection services.

The King County Flood Control District Board of Supervisors unanimously approved a 2019 district budget on Nov. 5. The $93 million budget maintains current flood protection services, and will continue to fund increased efficiency while taking necessary steps to prepare the region in preventing potential disasters that might occur due to a dam or levee failure.

“I am pleased with the investments the 2019 Flood Control District Budget makes across our region,” said district supervisor and county councilmember Pete von Reichbauer. “These projects emphasize public safety in communities like Pacific that are especially vulnerable to the devastating effects of flooding.”

To ensure that vital flood protection infrastructure is in place as quickly as possible, the flood control district is continuously looking for ways to improve its planning and project delivery. The 2019 budget funds the continued effort to streamline and boost the planning process.

The flood control district board of supervisors adopted the budget for the second time in three years. The budget will not include the standard 1 percent increase in property taxes.

“I thank my colleagues for agreeing to forego the property tax increase,” said county councilmember district supervisor Claudia Balducci. “While we undertake the important life and safety work of the district, we should also balance our responsibility to taxpayers to collect only the revenue we need to complete our capital program. I believe we have struck that balance today.”

To learn more information about the county’s flood control district, visit, www.kingcountyfloodcontrol.org.

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