John Taylor

John Taylor

John Taylor appointed first director of Department of Local Services for King County

Starting January 1, Taylor will lead the new Department of Local Services to better meet the needs of unincorporated King County.

The King County Council approved the appointment of John Taylor as the first director of the newly-formed Department of Local Services on Monday, Dec. 10.

In October, County Executive Dow Constantine selected Taylor to lead the Department of Local Services. The new department is an agency created to better meet the unique needs of unincorporated King County.

Starting Jan. 1, nearly 250,000 residents living in unincorporated King County will have a county department focusing on their needs.

“John Taylor will provide the leadership our new department needs to deliver outstanding service to the quarter-million people of unincorporated King County,” Constantine said in an October press release.

Executive Constantine added that he wants the Department of Local Services to start with a strong foundation that will empower employees to achieve the “highest level of customer satisfaction.” He believes Taylor will promote that type of workplace culture.

As the first director of the department, Taylor will focus on coordinating with councilmembers of the rural areas, deliver streamlined and responsive relationships with unincorporated King County communities, coordinating and collaborating in service delivery to unincorporated communities with partnering agencies including state, county and local organizations.

Taylor noted that Executive Constantine wants everyone living in unincorporated King County to have their own version of a city hall – a “hub” that coordinates services to improve their quality of life.

“Having a new department dedicated to unincorporated communities will make it easier for us to deliver direct services that would be unmatched in any city,” Taylor said.

Taylor earned his master’s degree in public administration from the University of Vermont. He’s worked for King County since 2013 as assistant director of the Water and Land Resource Division. Taylor has had experience in other government positions in Seattle and Vermont.

According to Councilmember Kathy Lambert, Taylor has already established working relationships with citizens in the unincorporated area.

“I’m excited that John will be taking on this new vitally important position, and I am confident in his ability to listen and respond to the unique needs of unincorporated residents around the county,” Lambert said.

The Department of Local Services will be funded by existing revenues. To see the press release, go online to www.kingcounty.gov.

More in News

Sexual misconduct reports triple following ‘Report it to Stop it’ campaign

Joint effort to curb unwanted harassment proves successful.

Candidates file for November 2019 election

Locals will vote on a variety of local and county positions.

King County Councilman Reagan Dunn sent a letter to the FBI asking for them to help investigate Allan Thomas (pictured), who is under investigation for stealing more than $400,000 of public funds and skirting election laws in an Enumclaw drainage district. Screenshot from King 5 report
King County Council requests report on special districts in wake of fraud allegations

Small, local special districts will face more scrutiny following Enumclaw drainage district case.

The Marquee on Meeker Apartments, 2030 W. Meeker St. in Kent, will feature 492 apartments and 12,000 square feet of retail. The first phase of 288 apartments is expected to be completed in early 2020. Developers are targeting people in their 20s and 30s to rent their high-end, urban-style apartments. Steve Hunter/staff photo
Housing study pokes holes in conventional wisdom

High construction and land costs will incentivize developers to build luxury units.

Susan’s quest for ‘justice’ and the civil legal system dilemma

While citizens have the right to an attorney in criminal cases, they’re not afforded the same rights in civil litigation.

(Linda J. Smith) Cherry trees fully in bloom at the state capital in Olympia.
                                (Linda J. Smith) Cherry trees fully in bloom at the state capital in Olympia.
I-1000 passes state legislature as advocates hope to increase equality

The initiative could allow affirmative action to return to Washington state after 20 years.

Kirkland approves updates to Rose Hill zoning

The amendments clarify language bringing the code in line with a recently passed neighborhood plan.

Kirkland outlaws backyard shooting

Gun owners can’t plink from their porch anymore.

Most Read