Nickel Bros. Moving Company relocated the house once before, in August 2016. Photo courtesy of the city of Kirkland

Historic Kirkland house to move to permanent location

  • Friday, August 11, 2017 9:34am
  • News

After nearly a year of being temporarily located in a church parking lot, Kirkland’s historic Trueblood House will be moved to a permanent home on Sixth Avenue in the Norkirk neighborhood.

From 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Aug. 15, Nickel Bros. Moving Company will once again relocate the house. Sixth Avenue will be closed during the move.

A house moving company based out of Vancouver, the Nickel Bros. financed the temporary relocation of the home last year in an effort to preserve it. The company worked closely with the city’s planning department and other city departments including building, fire and police, to transport the house on Aug. 17, 2016. They moved the house to Lakeside Christian Church, located on First Avenue just around the corner from the home’s original location.

Last year’s temporary move occurred in order to preserve the historic structure while a buyer was located. The house has since been purchased, and the new owners will now have a piece of Kirkland history.

The Trueblood House’s unique architectural style tells the story of Kirkland’s origins. The house was located one block from the busiest street in town, then known as Picadilly, and was one of eight homes built in 1889 by the Kirkland Land and Improvement Company. Incorporated by Peter Kirk and Leigh J. Hunt, owner and publisher of the Seattle Post Intelligencer, the Kirkland Land and Improvement Company was instrumental in Kirkland’s early development.

Seven of the eight homes were built for steel mill executives, while the Trueblood House was built for Kirkland’s first doctor, Dr. Barclay Trueblood. It later housed the doctor’s family, and his name remains associated with the house to this day.

For more information on the Trueblood House, contact the Nickel Bros. at (425) 257-2067.

Neighbors watch the house be moved to a temporary location in August 2016. Photo courtesy of the city of Kirkland

More in News

Sarah Yount, former YES client, speaks at YES’s 50th anniversary celebration on Nov. 2. Madison Miller/staff photo.
Youth Eastside Services celebrates 50 years

YES celebrates 50 years of providing youth and family behavioral health services.

Nude suspect blocks traffic, fights officers | Police blotter

The Kirkland police blotter for Oct. 25 through Nov. 1.

Sky Metalwala has been missing for seven years. Photo courtesy of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children
Police plead for help in search for missing boy

Sky has been missing since Nov. 6, 2011 and turned 9 years old on Sept. 2.

Protesters chant “What do we want? Justice! When do we want it? Now!” at the intersection of Northeast 124th Street and 124th Avenue Northeast Thursday evening. Kailan Manandic, staff photo
Kirkland locals rally in national protest to protect Mueller

Protesters across the nation respond to former Attorney General Jeff Session’s resignation.

From L-R: Panelist Roderic Camp from Claremont University, William Beezley from University of Arizona, Linda, and Guillermo Sheridan from UNAM-Seattle touched on the subject of U.S.-Mexico relations on Nov. 1 at Northwest University. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo.
Northwest University hosts public academic conference

NU partners with National Autonomous University of Mexico to discuss U.S.-Mexico relations

Kuderer leads Tom; Walen over Bright

Legislative District 48 race. Results are preliminary.

One of the things Kirkland’s Proposition 1 will pay for is police services. Courtesy photo
Voters decide on city’s Prop. 1 measure

The sales tax increase for police services and community safety was passing as of election night.

Democrats lead in 1st Legislative District

Derek Stanford and Shelley Kloba were successful in their re-election bids.

Most Read