First District’s Sen. Palumbo steps down from state Senate

He was elected in 2016 and is returning to the private sector to be closer to his home and young family.

  • Friday, May 24, 2019 10:59am
  • News
Guy Palumbo. Courtesy photo

Guy Palumbo. Courtesy photo

First Legislative District Sen. Guy Palumbo (D-Maltby) on Friday announced his decision to resign from the Senate.

Following his announcement, he released a statement:

“Representing the residents of the 1st Legislative District has been the distinguishing honor of my professional life. As rewarding as it has been to serve in the Senate, the role I cherish most is being a husband and father. I am returning to the private sector so I can be closer to my home and young family and my small business.”

A spokesperson for Palumbo said he would be working at Amazon.

“I ran in 2016 promising to address transportation and infrastructure problems in our community. In three short years, investments in our district have grown exponentially compared to the prior two decades with $720 million in transportation investments and another $180 million in capital construction investments.

“While the work isn’t finished, I feel like I am leaving our district and our state in better shape than when I took office. I am proud of leading on climate change and passing the nation’s strongest 100 percent clean energy bill as well as the Solar Fairness Act to ensure we promote installations of rooftop solar in our state.

“This past session, we worked to guarantee free college tuition for lower-income students. We created the nation’s first Long Term Care Trust to ensure that Washingtonians will have the care they need later in life. Our state continues to lead and make progress on key policy issues that will make people’s lives better.

“I am proud of what was accomplished during my time in the legislature. It was an honor to serve my community and to serve with my colleagues in the Senate and House.”

More in News

AR-15 rifle seized by Seattle police. File photo
King County examines gun violence trends

Nearly 77 percent of shooting victims this so far year in county have been people of color.

In this file photo, marchers make their way from Trinity Episcopal Church in Everett on Feb. 26, 2017. Muslim refugees’ admissions into the U.S. have declined by 85 percent since the Trump administration came into power in 2017, according to the International Rescue Committee. Sound Publishing file photo
Report: Fewer refugees settling in U.S. and Washington state

Admissions are on pace to only reach around one-fifth of their limit in 2019.

Caller concerned over dying racoon | Police Blotter

Police blotter for May 30-June 3.

Nurses, physicians and social workers continue their education on proper responses for human trafficking patients. Madeline Coats/staff photo
Health care professionals improve response for human trafficking victims

EvergreenHealth partnered with Seattle Against Slavery in the fight against labor and sex trafficking.

Kirkland faces a $10 million deficit next biennium

The city is already looking for ways to address it, but details will be scarce until this fall.

A high tide at Raymond’s Willapa Landing Park in Grays Harbor County, Washington. Sound Publishing file photo
On the West Coast, Washington is most prone to sea level rise damage

Report by the Center for Climate Integrity shows multibillion-dollar cost of battling back the sea.

Triplett talks 2019-20 Kirkland plans

The city manager addressed residents a Greater Kirkland Chamber of Commerce luncheon.

What’s next for Washington’s 2045 green energy goal?

The Legislature set the goal, but how does the state actually get there?

Most Read