Amy Falcone announces run for Kirkland City Council. Courtesy photo

Amy Falcone announces run for Kirkland City Council. Courtesy photo

Falcone announces run for Kirkland City Council

She is focused on inclusivity, smart growth and community safety.

  • Wednesday, March 6, 2019 2:45pm
  • News

Amy Falcone, human services commissioner and Finn Hill Neighborhood Alliance board member announced her intention to run for Kirkland City Council, Pos. 6, in this year’s election.

“This is the time to shape Kirkland’s future for generations to come,” Falcone in a press release. “Investments we make today will ensure Kirkland will be an inclusive, dynamic community, providing opportunities to live, work and play for all our future citizens.”

Falcone was one of the finalists for former Mayor Amy Walen’s vacated seat. According to the release, Falcone is endorsed by both retiring Kirkland City Councilmember Dave Asher and now Rep. Walen of the 48th Legislative District.

“As a human services commissioner, Falcone’s ability to see opportunities and passionately advocate for progress has already greatly benefited our city, and she will make even greater contributions on the city council.” Asher said in the release.

Walen added in the release, “Amy’s unique perspective as a special needs parent and her passion for ensuring that Kirkland is a welcoming and inclusive place for everyone shines through in her work every day. From advocating for more affordable housing to recommending additional resources for individuals with disabilities living in our city — she genuinely cares about the people of Kirkland.”

As a PTSA board president for Henry David Thoreau Elementary School and Finn Hill Neighborhood Alliance board member, Falcone represents the voices of busy Kirkland families, the release states. She has long advocated for maintaining the character of Kirkland’s neighborhoods and for increasing the city’s walkability during this time of unprecedented growth, according to the release.

“Amy’s leadership in the Lake Washington School District and [PTSA] has been integral in creating safer walk-to-school routes in her community and enacting positive change for students in special needs programs,” said LWSD board member Cassandra Sage in the release. “Both efforts will benefit families for years to come.”

In addition, Falcone’s extensive volunteerism and previous work as a researcher provided her with a solid foundation in managing to budget, the release states.

“Amy has shown strength in stewardship of local tax dollars in her work on Kirkland’s Human Services Commission. I am confident she will carry this over into strong fiscal responsibility on City Council,” said Kirkland Human Services Commission chair Kimberly Scott in the release.

Falcone spent more than a decade in social science research before moving to Kirkland, the release states. She earned her master of arts degree in sociology and bachelor of arts degree in biology from Temple University, where she also taught an undergraduate statistics class. She currently lives in the Finn Hill neighborhood with her husband and their three young children.

To learn more about Amy Falcone, visit her Facebook page at www.facebook.com/AmyFalconeForKirklandCityCouncil or her at www.AmyFalcone.org.

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