Englund runs for 45th district Senate seat

Jinyoung Lee Englund is running as a Republican for a 45th Legislative District seat to fill out the remainder of Sen. Andy Hill’s position following his death last year.

Englund said she is running to focus on issues constituents have talked with her about, including transportation concerns, fear of a state income tax and the increasing prices of car tabs.

“I’m running because I believe the Eastside, we are independent thinkers,” Englund said.

Sen. Hill was also an independent thinker, Englund said, and she hopes to continue his dedication to working together with both sides of the aisle in Olympia.

Englund is married to a Marine, and recently helped the Corps. develop their first in-house application designed to facilitate communication between Marines when they’re on leave as well as with their commanding officers.

She has also worked on developing digital currency.

She and her husband own a home in Woodinville.

Englund said she’s knocked on around 2,000 doors of constituents to figure out what they’re most concerned about.

“You hear people, directly from them, what is the problem and how they would want it fixed,” she said.

Partisan fighting is also another problem Englund sees in the state Legislature. She hopes to work with various people to find solutions.

“I believe that we need to continue (Hill’s) legacy of ensuring that we have compassionate state government, but one that also lives within its means,” she said.

The seat is currently held by Sen. Dino Rossi, who has said he will not run in November.

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