Citizens committee launches campaign to support LWSD levy and bond measures

  • Thursday, November 2, 2017 6:02pm
  • News

Guided by a mission to support schools in a fiscally responsible way, the Lake Washington Citizens Levy Committee recently launched its campaign in support of Lake Washington School District’s levy and bond measures that will appear on the Feb. 13, 2018 special election ballot.

The ballots are:

  • Prop 1: Replacement of Existing Educational Programs and Operations Levy
  • Prop 2: Replacement of Existing Capital Project Levy
  • Prop 3: Bonds to Reduce Overcrowding and Enhance Student Learning Environments

“The timing of these propositions is a win-win for taxpayers,” said Eric Campbell, CEO of Main Street Property Group and committee member, in a press release. “These proposals prioritize our schools’ most urgent overcrowding, education, safety, technology and maintenance needs. And, due to good fiscal planning, the LWSD tax rate will be reduced.”

LWSD is one of the fastest-growing districts in the state, the release states. This growth is at all levels, from kindergarten through high school. Data shows that the growth will continue. Many schools are already overcrowded and the district must rely on portable classrooms. According to the release, the bond will provide more classroom space to help relieve overcrowding. The levies will provide the funding needed to maintain the district’s educational programs and technology, improve facilities and fields, and keep students safe.

“Good schools and facilities positively affect our neighborhoods,” LWSD parent and committee member Martha DeAmicis said in the release. “Better schools develop our children to become helpful, productive members in our community. Investing in education for our young will improve the quality of life for everyone.”

In the release, Lake Washington Education Association president Kevin Teeley added, “The bond provides more classroom space to relieve overcrowding in our district, which is now the third largest in the state. The levies ensure teachers have the resources they need to help students succeed. Join us and vote ‘yes’ for our students, schools and communities.”

For more information, visit the committee’s website at www.vote4lwsdkids.org and the Lake Washington School District’s website at www.lwsd.org.

To register to vote, visit www.sos.wa.gov/elections.

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