A view of the Tolt barrier project. Photo courtesy of King County

A view of the Tolt barrier project. Photo courtesy of King County

Barrier that protects Eastside water to be repaired

The barrier protects a pipeline that delivers water to various Eastside cities and Seattle.

Work will begin soon to restore a barrier that protects a crucial water pipeline near Duvall.

The Tolt Pipeline Protection project will rebuild and improve some 1,200 feet of rock barriers along the Snoqualmie River south of the city. The pipeline is a crucial one for the area’s water supply as it pumps water to cities, including Bellevue, Bothell, Redmond and Seattle from the South Fork Tolt River Reservoir.

The barrier sits between a curve in the Snoqualmie River and the pipelines and was installed in the 1960s. Since then, erosion and river migration has severely damaged the barrier. The river is moving toward the pipeline, and if the barrier is not repaired, continued migration will eventually damage the pipeline.

The restoration project will include placing 760 large boulders and log structures near the river to reinforce the barrier. A small, collapsed culvert at Deer Creek will be removed and replaced some 600 feet upstream from its current location on the banks of the Snoqualmie River. The new culvert will be equipped with a floodgate and will not impede fish passage.

The project will cost roughly $10.2 million and is funded through the King County Flood Control District. Construction is expected to be completed in October.

Kathy Lambert, a King County council member who sits on the district’s board of directors, said the project is one of a slew that the flood district is working on. The district was formed in 2007 and identifies and completes projects to help reduce flooding and damages in the county.

Lambert said that due to regulations surrounding permitting, many projects have been in the works for years and are just now moving to construction. Many areas in the Snoqualmie valley are being studied for future projects, including roadway repairs, levee improvements and additional river bank repairs.

One large potential project could be the clearing out of a collection of rocks, known as an alluvial fan, near North Bend in the Snoqualmie River. These rocks build up near the three forks section of the river and slow water, which can lead to backups and flooding. However, Lambert said if they take action to clear it they would ensure the increased flow didn’t create more problems downstream.

“Those need to be cleaned on a regular basis,” she said.

County residents can sign up for flood alerts at the King County flood services website.

More in News

Candidates file for November 2019 election

Locals will vote on a variety of local and county positions.

King County Councilman Reagan Dunn sent a letter to the FBI asking for them to help investigate Allan Thomas (pictured), who is under investigation for stealing more than $400,000 of public funds and skirting election laws in an Enumclaw drainage district. Screenshot from King 5 report
King County Council requests report on special districts in wake of fraud allegations

Small, local special districts will face more scrutiny following Enumclaw drainage district case.

The Marquee on Meeker Apartments, 2030 W. Meeker St. in Kent, will feature 492 apartments and 12,000 square feet of retail. The first phase of 288 apartments is expected to be completed in early 2020. Developers are targeting people in their 20s and 30s to rent their high-end, urban-style apartments. Steve Hunter/staff photo
Housing study pokes holes in conventional wisdom

High construction and land costs will incentivize developers to build luxury units.

Susan’s quest for ‘justice’ and the civil legal system dilemma

While citizens have the right to an attorney in criminal cases, they’re not afforded the same rights in civil litigation.

(Linda J. Smith) Cherry trees fully in bloom at the state capital in Olympia.
                                (Linda J. Smith) Cherry trees fully in bloom at the state capital in Olympia.
I-1000 passes state legislature as advocates hope to increase equality

The initiative could allow affirmative action to return to Washington state after 20 years.

Kirkland approves updates to Rose Hill zoning

The amendments clarify language bringing the code in line with a recently passed neighborhood plan.

Kirkland outlaws backyard shooting

Gun owners can’t plink from their porch anymore.

Hospital workers support HB 1155 to implement uninterrupted rest breaks and provide limitations on the use of additional on-call work. Courtesy photo
Legislature passes break and overtime protections for health care workers

Washington State House and Senate have passed HB 1155 providing hospital workplace improvements.

Most Read