Jay Arnold was first elected to the council in 2013. Contributed photo

Arnold announces Kirkland City Council re-election bid

  • Monday, March 6, 2017 11:36am
  • News

Deputy Mayor Jay Arnold announced he is running for re-election to the Kirkland City Council, saying that he has more work to do to strengthen neighborhoods and prepare for new retail centers.

“I’m proud of what we have done in Totem Lake. The community saw its potential, and after decades, Totem Lake is finally happening. New developments are transformational for the area, and all of Kirkland,” Arnold said. “We have more opportunities to live, work, shop, and play — right here in our city. Together, we can build on this success and keep Kirkland moving forward.”

In conjunction with that growth, Arnold recognizes the need for the city prepare and invest. “With the Village at Totem Lake and re-development in downtown Kirkland, we need to have transportation, safety and pedestrian improvements ready,” he said.

Arnold added a review of transportation projects to the city’s 2017-2018 budget and proposed an update of the city’s Totem Lake action plan.

Finn Hill resident Scott Morris expressed support for Arnold because of his work on neighborhoods and safety. “Jay strengthened neighborhood policies in the Kirkland 2035 comprehensive plan,” Morris said. “He’s been a leader in supporting our efforts to develop Finn Hill’s first neighborhood plan and ensure plans are updated regularly in every neighborhood.”

“Jay supported and expanded neighborhood-led efforts, such as the neighborhood safety program and Green Kirkland, that enable people to get involved to make Kirkland a better place,” downtown resident Bea Nahon added.

“When people invest their time in Kirkland, we want to invest in them, ” Arnold said.

Arnold was first elected to the council in 2013. He chairs the council’s Planning and Economic Development Committee. Last year, he was chosen to be deputy mayor by his fellow councilmembers.

Regionally, Arnold has focused on issues including growth, transportation and environment. He represents Kirkland on the Eastside Transportation Partnership and Eastside Rail Corridor Regional Advisory Council and serves on the regional Growth Management Policy Board. He also is active on the King County Cities Climate Collaboration, a regular summit of area elected officials sharing work on climate change.

Arnold previously co-chaired the successful YES! For Great Kirkland Parks levy campaign in 2012, securing permanent funding for Kirkland parks.

He is a freelance web developer and IT consultant. Arnold and his wife, Mary Beth Binns, live in the Norkirk neighborhood. They have three daughters in Lake Washington schools.

This is taken from a press release.

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