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Tent City 4 seeks to set up camp at Kirkland church

Debra and Jack Exum work to secure a tarp over their tent to keep the rain out at Tent City 4 last November, when the encampment was located at St. John Vianney Church near Kirkland in unincorporated King County. - File Photo/Kirkand Reporter
Debra and Jack Exum work to secure a tarp over their tent to keep the rain out at Tent City 4 last November, when the encampment was located at St. John Vianney Church near Kirkland in unincorporated King County.
— image credit: File Photo/Kirkand Reporter

The homeless encampment known as Tent City 4 could come back to Kirkland this August.

The City of Kirkland has received a Temporary Use Permit application from Holy Spirit Lutheran Church and SHARE/WHEEL to establish Tent City 4 on church property from Aug. 1-Oct. 31.

As part of the application process, the church will hold a public informational meeting on Thursday, July 9 at 7 p.m. The church is located at 10021 NE 124th Street in Kirkland. City representatives will be present to answer permitting and public safety questions.

For permit information, go to www.ci.kirkland.wa.us/tentcity, email tentcity@ci.kirkland.wa.us.

In November, 2007, Tent City 4 was permitted by the city to locate at Holy Spirit Lutheran Church through February 2008. Kirkland Congregational Church, located at 106 Fifth Avenue, hosted the encampment in 2005 and 2008.

Property owners within 500 feet of the church property will receive notice of the application and notice of the decision of the city’s planning director regarding the permit application. City zoning regulations provide for temporary uses of land, including homeless encampments, when certain standards are met. If approved, the encampment may locate within the city for no more than 92 days and may not relocate to the same church for 12 months.

In 2006, the city adopted zoning regulations specific to homeless encampments which require, among other standards, sight-obscuring perimeter fencing (unless there is sufficient vegetation, topographic variation or other site condition such that fencing would not be needed), setbacks from adjoining residential properties and transit service to be located within one-half mile. Additionally, a code of conduct must be imposed on encampment residents, public health inspections must be allowed, and the maximum number of residents is 100. The zoning regulations provide for an administrative review by the Planning Director.

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