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State advising campaigners to check regulations for legal sign locations

The state Department of Transportation is reminding candidates and their supporters that campaign signs are not allowed in the state highway right of way.

Because it’s not always easy to know the boundaries of a state highway right of way, the department is offering some clues:

  • Utility poles are typically located inside the right of way; so no signs between the pole and the state highway.
  • Many locations also have a fence line separating the right of way from private property. Signs are not allowed between the fence and the state highway.

Under the Washington Administrative Code 468-66, temporary political signs are allowed on private property visible from state highways. However, the property owner must consent and the sign must comply with the WAC, as well as any local regulations.

Campaign signs on private property visible from the state highways must also meet the following requirements:

  • Maximum size of 32 square feet in area.
  • Remove within 10 days following the election.

Local municipalities might also have additional regulations, state officials said in a news release.

Questions about determining the boundary lines for a state highway right of way can be directed to: WSDOT Outdoor Advertising Specialist Pat O’Leary at OLearyP@wsdot.wa.gov or by calling 360-705-7296. Callers should be prepared to provide the state route number (Interstate 5, State Route 28, US 2, US 97, etc.) and the name of the nearest intersection or approximate highway milepost.

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