Erik Ashlie-Vinke, government affairs director for Economic Alliance Snohomish County, moderates a Town Hall with Sen. Guy Palumbo, Rep. Derek Stanford and Rep. Shelley Kloba from Washington’s 1st district on March 23 at Cascadia College. Katie Metzger/staff photo

Erik Ashlie-Vinke, government affairs director for Economic Alliance Snohomish County, moderates a Town Hall with Sen. Guy Palumbo, Rep. Derek Stanford and Rep. Shelley Kloba from Washington’s 1st district on March 23 at Cascadia College. Katie Metzger/staff photo

1st District legislators talk budget, transportation, housing

Health topics, including vaccines, vaping and long term care, also discussed at Bothell forum.

At their town hall on March 23 at Cascadia College, Sen. Guy Palumbo, Rep. Shelley Kloba and Rep. Derek Stanford — all Democrats from the 1st Legislative District — discussed Washington’s various funding challenges, along with potential solutions.

All three lawmakers wanted to see investments made in infrastructure, education and social services, and talked about new revenue options. These will likely be explored more as the House and Senate release their budget proposals this week.

Kloba said that when the state doesn’t meet its financial responsibilities, it ends up with court battles like McCleary for education funding, along with similar cases for fish culverts and public employee contracts.

Stanford said that Washington’s tax structure is among the most regressive in the country.

The three agreed that steps need to be taken to fix the state’s “upside down” structure and Kloba openly favored a capital gains tax. Palumbo said it would be unlikely to pass in the Senate, but other proposals, such as a tiered real estate excise tax, have a better chance.

“It’s a hard road, especially with the revenue forecast,” Palumbo said, noting that the state is predicting $861 million more than expected through 2021.

As far as transportation, Palumbo said he supports raising the gas tax to pay for projects across the state, in response to an audience question about the tolls on I-405.

“I’m against tolls; I have been from day one,” he said, adding that he’s tried several times to repeal them. “The reality is that they’re not going anywhere, so now the fight is to get that money for our district.”

The “good news,” he said, is that the 1st District has $668 million worth of projects — including the widening of SR-522, new lanes on I-405 and fixing the Clearview bottleneck — in a package proposed by Sen. Steve Hobbs (D-Lake Stevens).

“The bad news is we’re still trying to pass the package,” he said.

Stanford said he’d like to see more investments made in bus capacity, which would “help with congestion and provide more options,” but that the state needs to work with local transit agencies on funding it.

Palumbo said more coordination is also needed on Sound Transit’s Bus Rapid Transit projects in the area.

Kloba, who supports tolls, said that reliance on the gas tax is “problematic” as vehicles become more efficient.

The legislators said that the state should also be stepping up to fund special education and behavioral health.

Palumbo said that addiction, mental health and lack of affordable housing are related problems that are contributing to the homelessness crisis, but that the approach should be to deal with the causes instead of “throw[ing] more money at the problem.” For his part, Palumbo said his focus is on increasing housing supply.

Stanford said he supports ideas like Bothell’s Navigator program, because it’s important to divert people from the criminal justice system into services, as well as eviction reform.

As far as health issues, Kloba, Palumbo and Stanford all supported the limits on exemptions from the measles vaccine, as well as a Medicaid rate increase for nursing homes and the Long-Term Care Trust Act.

On other education issues, they supported “multiple pathways” to graduation, and a tax on vaping, which Stanford said is “an epidemic in our schools.”

On the environment, they supported the 100 percent clean energy bill and other policies aimed to reduce emissions.

“The governor…said that instead of hitting a grand slam, which would be something like the carbon tax, we’re going to hit a couple singles and doubles,” Palumbo said.

For those who didn’t get to attend the forum, the legislators will host a tele-town hall on April 1.

More in News

File photo
$30 car tab proposal returns to ballot in November

Tim Eyman-led initiative would restrict car tabs and transportation benefit districts in Washington.

File photo
King County alcohol production ordinance could be approved by year’s end

Update to county code has been more than a year in the making.

Disclosure complaints filed against EvergreenHealth Foundation

Alleged violations include failing to adhere to reporting required by recently passed DISCLOSE Act.

Women and families homeless shelter in Kirkland receives grant

Premera Blue Cross selected Catholic Community Services and the Sophia Way as recipients for the $250,000 grant.

KCSO found all but one of the 108 allegations of excessive or unnecessary use of force were justified

The Office of Law Enforcement Oversight has released its annual 2018 report.

Design plans submitted for upcoming culvert replacement in Kirkland

Construction at 100th Avenue Northeast planned to begin next summer.

Kirkland City Hall. Photo courtesy city of Kirkland
Kirkland council passes new affordable housing initiative pilot

The pilot was approved 6-1 at the council’s Sept. 3 meeting.

Most Read