Lifestyle

Recent cardiac arrest incident is good reminder to pay attention to signs of heart attack

A Heart Attack occurs when the blood flow that brings oxygen to the heart muscle is severely reduced or stopped. This happens because coronary arteries that supply the heart with blood can slowly become thicker and harder from a buildup of fat, cholesterol and other substances, called plaque. This slow process is known as atherosclerosis. If the plaque breaks open and a blood clot forms that blocks the blood flow, a heart attack occurs. - American Heart Association
A Heart Attack occurs when the blood flow that brings oxygen to the heart muscle is severely reduced or stopped. This happens because coronary arteries that supply the heart with blood can slowly become thicker and harder from a buildup of fat, cholesterol and other substances, called plaque. This slow process is known as atherosclerosis. If the plaque breaks open and a blood clot forms that blocks the blood flow, a heart attack occurs.
— image credit: American Heart Association

A 64-year-old man called 9-1-1 when he felt chest pain on Oct. 22.

As Kirkland Fire Department rescue crews arrived, the man went into cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was started. Aid crews also used a defibrillator to help get the patient’s heart started again. The man’s heart stopped many times at the scene and on the way to Evergreen Hospital Medical Center.

By the following day, hospital staff cleared a 100 percent block of a major artery and the patient was doing fine.

The Kirkland Fire Department is asking all residents to know the symptoms of a heart attack and call 9-1-1 as soon as possible. However, according to the American Heart Association, the most common symptoms of a heart attack include chest discomfort, discomfort radiating to the upper body, shortness of breath and sweating, nausea, lightheadedness. Symptoms can be different for men and women. To learn more, go to the American Heart Association website at www.heart.org.

 

EMAIL NEWSLETTERS

Latest news, top stories, and community events,
delivered to your inbox.

We encourage an open exchange of ideas on this story's topic, but we ask you to follow our guidelines for respecting community standards. Personal attacks, inappropriate language, and off-topic comments may be removed, and comment privileges revoked, per our Terms of Use. Please see our FAQ if you have questions or concerns about using Facebook to comment.

Read the latest Green Edition

Browse the print edition page by page, including stories and ads.

Sep 26 edition online now. Browse the archives.