File photo courtesy of Sound Transit

File photo courtesy of Sound Transit

ORCA cards now free for seniors, disabled and low-income commuters

Changes increase access to transit services in the Puget Sound region

  • Tuesday, July 3, 2018 8:30am
  • Life

Any Puget Sound area seniors, ages 65 and older, or disabled residents who qualify for an ORCA Regional Reduced Fare Permit (RRFP) can now get their first card at no charge.

The RRFP program, and ORCA LIFT card for income-eligible riders, provide a savings of 45 percent or more on transit fares.

“Getting a reduced-fare ORCA pass is now easier and more affordable for people who need it most,” said John Resha, King County Metro Assistant General Manager and Chair of the ORCA Joint Board. “We hear every day from customers whose lives have been changed by better access to transit, and we hope this encourages more people who qualify to participate in our reduced-fare programs.”

RRFPs provide riders with reduced fares on services operated by ORCA agencies, including Community Transit, Everett Transit, King County Metro, Kitsap Transit, Pierce Transit, Sound Transit and Washington State Ferries. For more information on getting an RRFP card, visit the agencies’ websites or www.orcacard.com.

An ORCA LIFT card, which is also available at no charge to income-eligible customers, provides reduced fares on all Sound Transit services, King County Metro buses, Kitsap Transit buses and ferries, King County water taxis and Seattle streetcars. Information is available on the agencies’ websites.

Both ORCA RRFP and ORCA LIFT users can use their card’s E-purse to load value on the card for one trip at a time or add a pass for unlimited rides for a whole month. While the first RRFP and ORCA LIFT cards are free under the changes that went into effect yesterday, replacing a lost or stolen card will cost the user $3.

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