Carmelo Ramirez (left) and owner, Mike Wehrle receive customers in their Kirkland lot on 1006 Lake St. S . Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo

Carmelo Ramirez (left) and owner, Mike Wehrle receive customers in their Kirkland lot on 1006 Lake St. S . Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo

Kirkland’s MJW Services includes holiday cheer in its landscaping services

MJW has helped families find their perfect Christmas tree since 1994.

It all started in 1994 for Mike Wehrle, owner of MJW Services in Kirkland.

Wehrle recalls seeing a big parking lot and thought it would be a great place to sell Christmas trees. He didn’t know much about Christmas trees back then, but that’s where it all started for MJW Services Landscaping company to offer Christmas trees and wreaths.

Founded in 1985, MJW Services serves Seattle and the greater Eastside with landscaping services. Its year-round services providescostumers with landscaping design, installation and maintenance. Wehrle said their longevity is what sets them apart from other landscaping companies. During the holiday season, MJW offers fresh cut trees, wreaths and garlands. Customers can visit the lot at 1006 Lake St. S in Kirkland or order online.

MJW’s tree lot is one of the few tree lots found in Kirkland. Buyers can visit the lot M-F from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo

MJW’s tree lot is one of the few tree lots found in Kirkland. Buyers can visit the lot M-F from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo

“We have exceptional service. We’ve been around for 24 years. We have longevity,” Wehrle said. “At least two or three generations have been coming here. We’ve seen the same families for over 20 years. It’s a pretty fun place here.”

According to Wehrle, the holiday season starts as early as September. MJW will keep in contact with larger clients like Google, REI and car dealerships in the area. MJW sets up its lot in early November and has sold around 18,000 trees so far. The trees are grown and bought from Mossyrock, Washington and are cut four days before delivery. MJW offers grand firs, Fraser firs and noble fir trees as well as wreaths and garlands.

MJW offers five different type of trees in various sizes. The upper part of the lot holds the larger trees that measure anywhere from18 - 25 feet. It takes around 17 crew members to set up larger trees. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo

MJW offers five different type of trees in various sizes. The upper part of the lot holds the larger trees that measure anywhere from18 - 25 feet. It takes around 17 crew members to set up larger trees. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo

MJW also offers services that is convenient to buyers. Staff are available for delivery set up, which includes a fresh-cut tree trunk, custom pruning and trimming, professional installation of the tree onto stand, desired placement, initial tree watering and courtesy tidying up the tree installation area. Tree removal and disposable is also available.

Tatiana Pinto, who works at the Kirkland tree lot, said she recognizes a lot of the customers who come to MJW. She said various customers have been buying trees from MJW for many years. The crew knows what those families want and they have them ready for pickup.

“It’s fun with families who’ve been buying from us for a long time,” Pinto said. “That’s what makes lots special.”

MJW’s tree lot is one of the few tree lots found in Kirkland. Buyers can visit the lot from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturdays and from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Sundays.

MJW will be open until Dec. 21.

To learn more about MJW’s services visit, www.mjwservices.com.

Customers can find Grand Fir, Fraser Fir and Noble Fir trees at the Christmas tree lot. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo

Customers can find Grand Fir, Fraser Fir and Noble Fir trees at the Christmas tree lot. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo

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