Jerry Cornfield

The session that would never end is still not over | Cornfield

For six months – officially 168 days and counting on Thursday – the state’s 147 citizen legislators and chief executive have been passing policies and playing politics.

Cone of silence shrouds Olympia on budget progress | Cornfield

If silence is golden, a lot of wealth is stockpiled in the state Capitol, where lawmakers and the governor are mum on progress in reaching a deal on a new state budget.

State budget negotiations reach state of urgency with shutdown looming | Cornfield

There’s nothing quite like the threat of a government shutdown July 1 to infuse urgency into negotiations on a new state budget.

No simple fix to school funding issue | Cornfield

The way Washington pays for public schools is illegal.

Cap-and-trade bill still gasping for political life | Cornfield

Cap-and-trade seemed dead and buried among the year’s fallen legislative ideas — until it wasn’t this week.

It didn’t take long to liquidate state auditor’s legacy | Cornfield

It took 207 days of campaigning through two elections in 2012 for Troy Xavier Kelley to secure the job as Washington’s state auditor.

State lawmakers up for raise in two years | Cornfield

State lawmakers are up for a raise in the next two years.

Majority of Washington voters won’t have a hand presidential primary | Cornfield

You know the quadrennial quandary in this state about how to make the presidential primary meaningful?

Governor, lawmakers meet to discuss budget | Cornfield

There will be no pomp or ceremony today when Gov. Jay Inslee plans to sit down with the Democrat and Republican leaders of the House and Senate to talk budget.

Kelley has become a pariah in his own party in just two weeks | Cornfield

No one but Troy Xavier Kelley knows how long he will be the state auditor of Washington.

Presidential primary puts parties in same old quandry | Cornfield

It is Washington’s quadrennial quandary. Every four years, the conversation starts anew on how to make this state’s presidential primary meaningful in the process of electing the nation’s next leader.

Legislators eyeing five bills on election process | Cornfield

Lawmakers are looking at ways to make the election process cheaper for voters, easier to see who is funding campaigns and harder to run initiatives with financial consequences.

New legislative session means more laws | Cornfield

With the start of another year comes the promise of another session of the state Legislature and the prospect — no, make that a guarantee — of more laws.

Democrats question why I-594 didn’t bring more voters out | Cornfield

Democrats are trying to sort out what went wrong in the election and why the presence of Initiative 594 on the ballot didn’t motivate more of their voters to turn out.

How the GOP got its groove back | Cornfield

Looks like the Grand Old Party got its groove back. After this election, Republicans will hold a majority of seats in the state Senate for the first time since 2004 and boast their largest contingent in the state House in more than a decade.

DelBene, Celis highlight differences in final debate at Microsoft

In their final debate Wednesday, Democratic U.S. Rep. Suzan DelBene and Republican challenger Pedro Celis didn’t break any new ground or exchange withering verbal punches.

Marijuana millions getting close look | Cornfield

The financial stakes of the state’s new marijuana industry are no longer theoretical. Washington’s chief economist predicts the legal recreational market will generate $636 million for the state through the middle of 2019.

Wealthy social changers backing gun restrictions | Cornfield

Our state’s super wealthy social changers are at it again.

Celis aligns himself with political heavyweights | Cornfield

Republican Pedro Celis needs a spark for his congressional campaign and hopes it will come from two men who helped a Tea Party-backed candidate unseat U.S. House Majority Leader Eric Cantor.

The disinterest is everywhere in this election | Cornfield

I’ve heard from some eligible voters that they intend to sit this one out and return for the general election in November, “when it matters.”